Last week on Unknown Country we ran a story which put forward a theory that, if food supplies run short in the future, we could turn to the insect world to provide a source of protein for our nutritional needs.

Subscribers had mixed views on the subject, but for those of you who dismissed the idea as outlandish or unthinkable, think again. Research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that insects have already played a significant role in our past diet and may even have been the driving evolutionary force behind the development of our large brains.
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In this age of performance augmentation, rumors of cognitive enhancement therapies abound. Loosely defined, certain types of cognitive enhancers are available to us all without needing to visit the doctor or a drug-dealer; the vast majority of the world’s inhabitants kick-start their day (and their brain!) with a cup of tea or coffee, utilising the caffeine content of favorite beverages to chemically augment their neurological systems and give them a temporary high that propels them through the initial shock of a brand new day.
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 Brain and other nervous system cancers are expected to claim 14,320 lives in the United States this year, but a recent study has brought hope to this field of oncology.

Much like using dimmer switches to brighten or darken rooms, biochemists have identified a protein that can be used to slow down or speed up the growth of brain tumors in mice.

The results of the preclinical study “CFIm25 links Alternative Polyadenylation to Glioblastoma Tumour Suppression” led by Eric J. Wagner, Ph.D., and Ann-Bin Shyu, Ph.D., of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and Wei Li, Ph.D., of Baylor College of Medicine appear in the Advance Online Publication of the journal Nature.
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The most common perception regarding the purpose of our brain is the major processor for all of our thought, that this is where an individual’s "mind" resides, along with their essence of self and identity. Certainly, brain damage can affect our cognitive abilities, substantiating the purely scientific stance that we are no more than biological entities without souls, but is that the full story?

A recent study that claims to be able to "switch off" brain activity suggests that the brain is ultimately controllable via external and internal sources, like a computer operating system.
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