A Japanese surgeon claims that video games can damage thebrain. Akio Mori, a cranial nerve specialist at NihonUniversity College of Humanities and Sciences in Tokyo, sayshe?s concerned about the impact of video games on children’sbrains, after he recorded a lack of beta brainwave activityin young people who played them frequently.

He says this shows the children were barely using thefrontal regions of their brains, which are important foremotional processing, planning and self-control. “If levelsof beta brainwaves are very low, people get angry easily andhave difficulty in concentrating,” Mori says.
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Professional musicians have more gray matter in the part of the brain that processes music. This may explain why some people seem to be born musicians, while the rest of us struggle with piano lessons. But scientists aren?t sure whether some people are born with the extra gray matter, or if it?s developed over years of practicing an instrument. Also, did great musicians like Mozart have more gray matter than rock musicians do today?
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Professor Andrew Newberg, of the University of Pennsylvania, measures prayer. He invites Buddhists and Franciscan nuns to meditate and pray in a secluded room. At the peak of their devotions, he injects a tracer that travels to their brains and reveals brain activity at the moment of transcendence.

He has found that there is a small region near the back of the brain that constantly calculates a person?s sense of where the body ends and the world begins. During intense prayer or meditation, for unknown reasons, this region becomes a quiet oasis of inactivity as the person becomes ?one? with the universe.
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Everything that makes us “human” is thought to be contained in a part of our brains the size of a billiard ball.Researchers who study the brain say they think they have found the part of it that sets us apart from other primates.

Putting ourselves in others’ shoes, or understanding what others may be thinking, is what scientists consider to be thebasis of socialization, which is what makes us human. We can feel empathy and sympathy for others. Humans also have asense of humor and can detect when other people are being sarcastic or-at times-deceptive.

Dr. Donald Stuss, one of the world’s experts on the brain, found that these functions are all concentrated inside asmall region within the frontal lobes.
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