Maggot infestations, rotting carcasses, unidentifiable gunk in the kitchen sink – how much your brain responds to disgusting images could predict whether you are liberal or conservative.

In a study to be published in an upcoming issue of Current Biology, an international team of scientists led by Virginia Tech reports that the strength of a person’s reaction to repulsive images can forecast their political ideology.

“Disgusting images generate neural responses that are highly predictive of political orientation even when those neural responses don’t correspond with an individual’s conscious reaction to the images,” said Read Montague, a Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute professor who led the study.
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A grain of truth is often to be found in age-old remedies, with science often proving concepts and advice that our forefathers have been using for centuries. When faced with a dilemma, how many times have we been advised to "sleep on it" in the hope that the right solution will come to us while we slumber?

It seems that science has now proved that this sage advice also has a basis in truth, according to the results of a recent study conducted by researchers at École normale supérieure in Paris.
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Scientists have found a way to send brain-to-brain messages using brainwaves connected to computer technology.

A team of researchers from the University of Barcelona in Spain, Axilum Robotics in France, Harvard Medical School and Starlab Barcelona in Spain used EEG headsets to record the electrical activity in the brain related to the formulation of the words ‘hola’ and ‘ciao.’ A computer then converted these messages into binary and used electrical stimulation to implant the information into the receiver’s mind, which then appeared as specific flashes of light in the corner of their vision. The "telephathic" greeting was sent from subject in Thiruvananthapuram, India to another in Strasbourg using only brain-power.
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Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have made an astonishing breakthrough: they believe that they now have the ability to erase feelings of fear or anxiety.The researchers discovered which brain circuits attach emotions to memories but, more importantly, they worked out how to reverse this link.

Traumatic experiences can have a profound and negative effect that leaves people emotionally scarred for life, but neuroscientists believe that it may now be possible for them to erase residual feelings of trauma. This could benefit those suffering from depression or post-traumatic stress disorder and remove the need for strong medication.
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