New technology is allowing people who are paralyzed, due to accidents or to diseases like ALS (the condition that quantum physicist Stephen Hawking has), to operate computers using only their brains. A fourteen-year-old boy with epilepsy has learned to play Space Invaders using only brain signals. And new breakthrough in stem cell research may be able to actually cure people with ALS.

Researchers have shown that transplanting human stem cells into spinal cords of rats bred to duplicate Lou Gehrig?s disease delays the start of the nerve cell damage and prolongs life. The stem cells develop into nerve cells that connect with existing nerves and do not themselves succumb to ALS. While this is not yet a cure, it does demonstrate hope for the future.
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Researcher Kevin Tracy has discovered a key mind/body link which explains why meditation and biofeedback works?why you can sometimes “think” yourself to health. He recently gave a paper on his discoveries at a conference honoring the Dalai Lama.
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People who hear voices in their heads are considered to be schizophrenics, despite the fact that many UFO witnesses hear the visitors speak to them that way and psychiatrist and UFO researcher John Mack proved that these people WERE NOT mentally ill.

Andrea Thompson writes in LiveScience.com that scientists now think that hearing voices in your head can be a positive experience, not a sign of mental illness. Studies by Dutch scientists in the 1990s found that almost everyone has auditory hallucinations at times, and some healthy people hear them regularly. Many of these people do not find these voices stressful in any way, and some people find them inspirational. They think that around 4% of the population hears voices in their heads.
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We make one of the most important decisions of our lives?whether or not to trust another person?in less than one second. Psychologist Alex Todorov flashed photographs to 200 volunteers for one second?and sometimes even LESS, and asked them to rate how trustworthy each face was. Even if they were given more time, their original, “snap” judgement of the person in the photograph did not change.

LiveScience.com reports that Todorov still can’t figure out exactly what it was about each photo that made the faces seem trustworthy?or not.
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