It turns out that the human brain takes a series of snapshots, very quickly, that appears to us as continuous perception. This is the way a movie filmstrip works–the dark line between each frame tricks the eye and the brain to perceiving a series of still images as moving. Could this be why it is so difficult for us to see the visitors–that they can control how they synchronize with our perception?

Just as the body goes through a 24-hour sleep-wake cycle controlled by a circadian clock, brain function undergoes such cyclic activity–but at a much faster rate.
read more

Why do the elderly support politicians who want to do away with Medicare and Social Security? Scientists say this is because a specific area of the brain has deteriorated or is damaged.

By examining patients with various forms of brain damage, researchers have pinpointed the precise location in the human brain, called the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, that controls belief and doubt, and which explains why some of us are more gullible than others.
read more

Drug research is changing: instead of pills, researchers are concentrating on "bioelectronics" that "zap" the brain into healing the body through electronic signaling. A lot this has to do with implants (NOTE: Subscribers can still listen to this show). Neurological problems, from stroke and epilepsy to depression, will be treated through brain implants rather than pills or injections.
read more

Can’t remember where you put your keys? (How about your Key!) Are you more forgetful than you used to be? It could be because you’re EATING TOO MUCH.

New research suggests that consuming between 2,100 and 6,000 calories per day may double the risk of memory loss among people age 70 and older. Neurologist Yonas E. Geda says, "We observed a dose-response pattern which simply means; the higher the amount of calories consumed each day, the higher the risk of (memory loss)." His study revealed that the odds of being forgetful in old age more than doubled for those in the highest calorie-consuming group compared to those in the lowest calorie-consuming group.
read more