Astronomers in the UK are planning a mission to find out if a dangerous asteroid will hit the earth between 2029 and 2036?and to figure out what we can do to stop it.

BBC News reports that a thousand-foot-wide rock called Apophis is hurtling through space and is due to fly past the Earth in April, 2029 “at a distance [of around 22,000 miles] that is closer than many communications satellites.” So far, we haven’t heard any news about this from NASA, which seems too busy with plans to return to the moon in order to get hold of the valuable Helium 3 fuel there, but the UK is offering a $50,000 prize to the group that can track the asteroid and perhaps even find a way to deflect its orbit. A small British space company called Astrium thinks they can do it.
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In the last few years we’ve had some near misses with asteroids and will again in the future. A team of scientists and engineers are striving to save humanity from asteroid impacts that could threaten life on earth.

Richard Fork is assembling a team to conduct research into deflecting asteroids that may endanger us. We now know it was an asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs. One of his plans is to someday use a laser beam to trace, and perhaps alter, their trajectories.
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If you live on the East Coast, go outside and look up at the night sky on Saturday night, and you’ll see an astounding event: the Leonid meteor shower.

Joe Rao writes in space.com that the Leonids are made up of the dusty debris from a comet that orbits the sun every 33 years. This dust produces spectacular meteor displays and “shooting stars.” The expected time of peak activity is around midnight EST.

Art credit: gimp-savvy.com
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Scientists recently dug up a 154-pound meteorite that had been buried 4 feet deep in a Kansas wheat field. They located the meteorite by using radar technology that NASA someday hopes to use on Mars.

Roxana Hegeman writes in LiveScience.com that this new technology was able to locate the meteorite precisely and make an accurate three-dimensional image of it, while it was still in the ground. Space scientist Patricia Rieff says, “It validates the technique so we can use something similar to that instrument when we go to Mars.”
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