Thousands of ancient rock carvings believed to be 12,000 years old are currently being excavated in India. These petroglyphs, found in the hills of the Konkan region of western Maharashtra, represent a wide variety of artistic styles and depict the forms of animals, birds, fish, humans and geometrical forms. The archaeologists that are documenting them believe that they may be the oldest known examples of their kind — and that the civilization that created them is one that was lost to the sands of time.
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A 130-foot stone monolith has been discovered in the sea off of the Italian coast, that researchers say is at least 9,500 years old. The find was made during a high-resolution mapping survey of the seafloor off the coast of Sicily. The stone is in 40m (131 feet) of water, at a spot 60km (37 miles) south of the Italian island.

The regularly-shaped stone is 12m (39 feet) long and is estimated to weigh 15 tons. It has three 24-inch holes, two in it’s sides, and a third one at one end that passes completely through from one side to the other. While the monolith’s original function remains a mystery, one guess made by the researchers is that it may have been used as a lighthouse, with the hole in the end holding a torch as a beacon.
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Halloween, the time when we lure strangely-clad strangers to our homes by lighting lanterns in our windows, and offering them food and welcome at our doors.

This tradition is firmly associated with the celebration of ghosties and ghoulies and long-legged beasties and things that go bump in the night, but does it also fulfil some deep-rooted need in us to just go forth into the darkness of a night lit only by lanterns?

Fire is fast becoming an elusive element in our lives, yet for our ancestors it was a vital part of their existence. After human ancestors controlled fire 400,000 to 1 million years ago, flames not only let them cook food and fend off predators, but also extended their day.
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