Clear cutting the rainforest is having MURDEROUS consequences. On May 24, the dead bodies of rainforest activist Jose Caludio Riberio da Sliva (who had predicted his death six months earlier at an environmental conference) and his wife, Maria do Espírito Santo were found next in a rural town in Brazil. Da Silva’s ear had been cut off, probably taken as a trophy taken by the killers as proof their mission had been accomplished (so they could get paid by whoever ordered the killings).
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Brazil, home of the amazon rain forest, is a major source of soy beans. A major US corporation is exporting soy from Brazil to the United States and Europe, causing land prices there to increase almost 20%. Millions of acres of rain forest have been turned into soy fields. Since we don’t eat that much Chinese food in Europe and the US, who is consuming all this soy? It’s being fed to cattle and other livestock.

In the Independent, Andrew Gumbel writes that “an estimated 20% of the Amazon rainforest has already been destroyed, and about 6,500 square miles more was lost between 2005 and 2006.”
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A severe drought has been affecting the amazon?the world’s largest rainforest?for two years, but this has gone unreported here in the U.S. But the rest of the world is paying attention. In the New Zealand Herald, reporter Geoffrey Lean writes that “one further dry year?could tip the whole vast forest into a cycle of destruction” causing the rest of the world to become “hotter and drier”?in other words, a “worldwide catastrophe.”
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Scientists have been warning us about the destruction of the Amazon rainforest, but now U.S. scientists James Alcock, of Pennsylvania State University, says that the forest could reach a ?point of no return? in as little as 10 or 15 years, if deforestation continues at the rate of about one percent a year, and disappear within half a century. This is much sooner than has been predicted in other studies, which estimate that total rainforest loss won?t occur until the end of this century, 75 to 100 years from now.
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