One of the biggest barriers to the implementation of useful artificial intelligence in our culture is the limitations imposed by our computer hardware: modern computer chips have their circuits arranged in a two-dimensional layout, running programs that are meant to mimic our own three-dimensional neurological processes. The 2D setup was, and indeed still is, better suited to the more linear processing that the majority of our computer programs require, but running AI-based programs presents a sizable drop in efficiency — it is apparent that if AI is to grow as a valuable tool, a new form of computer hardware will be required to accommodate it.
read more

Most of us are familiar with the theories that as humans, we’ve lost some a number of the natural senses that our ancient ancestors used to employ, ranging from our current concept of a "sixth sense", to the 360 senses described in ancient Egyptian writings. While many of us get by with only five senses to guide us, a company called Cyborg Nest is developing an implant that will hopefully re-enable one of these ancient abilities.
read more

Because of the physical limitations of silicon-based circuitry, there is an upper limit to how powerful a modern computer can be made. In response to this, researchers have been looking into other mediums to build faster and more powerful computers from, including using quantum-based processors, and neurological chips based on human brain cells. Another promising idea, based on DNA, plans to utilize the otherwise naturally-occurring computer of genetics.
read more