When it comes to waging war on Afghanistan, we might as well turn around and go home. The British occupied that country from 1839 to 1842, and ended up going home with their tails between their legs, and it looks like we will too.

In the August 16th issue of the New York Review of Books, Rory Stewart writes: "The British ‘Army of the Indus’ swaggered into Kabul from India in 1839 (with) the general’s personal baggage loaded onto 260 camels." Besides soldiers in scarlet cloaks, he brought along a pack of hounds, in case he wanted to hunt foxes. The Afghans "were soon watching ice skating and giving advice to British women on their geraniums."
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In the June 19th issue of the UK magazine “The Spectator,” John C. Hulsman and Jaakko Kooroshy state their opinion that the “good news” of trillions in mineral wealth in Afghanistan is just part of the propaganda war of Obama and General Petraeus, as they try desperately to keep voters positive about a war that seems like a hopeless quagmire. The government is obviously not being straight with us.
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