In Whitley Strieber’s 1984 book Nature’s End, he mentioned a revolutionary new solar energy converter called Lumeloid by its inventor, Dr. Alvin Marks. This material was capable of converting sunlight into electricity at a 50% efficiency rate. As such, it could revolutionize the entire power industry by reducing dependence on oil.

Strieber was then told that the material had been classified. He met Dr. Marks and Secretary of Defense Casper Weinberger at a dinner, and asked the secretary to release the formula to the world. There was no response, and he was left not knowing the actual status of the material.

Now, however, both Dr. Marks and Lumeloid have reappeared on the scene. According to a story in the November 30 edition of the Arlington Institute’s Future Edition, Dr. Marks is now introducing Lumeloid to the public.

According to what Strieber learned in 1984, Lumeloid was planned to be used on satellite solar panels, and was one of the reasons why US satellites did not carry nuclear reactors like their Soviet counterparts. At the time, the classification of the material was justified for cold war reasons and because it was thought to be impossible to manufacture in large quantities.

Strieber attempted to get a Japanese company to sponsor a contest to streamline the manufacturing process. This effort was also unsuccessful.

Lumeloid is even more desperately needed now. To learn more about this revolutionary product, go to Dr. Mark’s website. To read the Scientific American article on Lumeloid, click here.

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