It’s no secret that Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and her campaign chairman John Podesta have a keen interest in the subject of unidentified flying objects — both have publicly discussed this interest, and their intention to instigate disclosure of any material that they’re able to obtain. Correspondence found in the recent Wikileaks release of Clinton’s hacked emails reinforce their views, showing Podesta discussed UFOs with late Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell, as well as other individuals that may have had insider information on the subject.

And Clinton’s emails proved to be no exception: in an email from November of last year, Clinton’s deputy communications director, Kristina Schake, responded to a question from Podesta regarding Hillary’s appearance on a recent episode of Jimmy Kimmel Live!, simply asking "How as [sic] Jimmy Kimmell?":

Schake’s response was quite revealing: "She was charming, got lots of laughs and worked in a lot of message, including climate change. He didn’t end up asking her about UFOs! She was very disappointed. She practiced UAPs for 5 minutes beforehand."

It’s not every day that we learn that a public official is not only comfortable with discussing the subject of UFOs in public, but also winds up being disappointed when the subject isn’t brought up to begin with. Kimmel rectified his earlier omission when Clinton made another appearance on his show in March 2016, making a point of asking her about UFOs.

“You know, there’s a new name. It’s unexplained aerial phenomenon ― UAP ― that’s the latest nomenclature," Clinton said, referring to a more contemporary term coined by the National Aviation Reporting Center on Anomalous Phenomena (NARCAP), in a 1999 report. (Clinton made a mistake when relating the term, of which should be “unidentified aerial phenomena.”)

Clinton repeated her pledge to, if elected President, “go into those files and, hopefully, make as much of that public as possible. If there’s nothing there, let’s tell people there’s nothing there. If there is something there, unless it’s a threat to national security, I think we ought to share it with the public.”