Unknowncountry.com has been covering the Fukushima disaster since it took place and we have never been satisfied that the public was being told the real story. Now it appears that highly radioactive water is leaking out of the plant and into the Pacific Ocean, and it is not clear when, or if, it can be stopped. Should the leak continue unabated, there will be two choices: either continue to flood the reactor and allow the irradiated water to leak into the ocean, or stop flooding and let the reactor melt down. Obviously, either of these alternatives is a disaster.

Tokyo Electric Power has been criticized over its poor handling of the crisis and its failure to keep either Japanese officials or the public informed of the true extent of the problem. However, other authorities around the Pacific Basin have also been unwilling or unable to keep the public adequately informed, and this includes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which has been inconsistent in its publication of data about contamination along the US west coast.

The leaking water is not just flowing into the Pacific, it also has the potential to rise to the surface and bypass the barrier that it holding most of it back at present. This would create a serious environmental disaster that would affect an unknown area of the Pacific. According to the Japanese Nuclear Regulatory Agency, this is a disaster that Tepco is not addressing with the urgency needed. The Japanese newspaper Asahi estimates that a complete breach could take place in three weeks.

This important story is being ignored in the US media so that the public won’t be frightened…and will keep innocently eating what could soon be irradiated seafood. Fish such as tuna, which travel across the Pacific, may be at great risk.

What can you do about it? Certainly, relying on the authorities is a waste of time. Whitley Strieber says, "I got a Geiger counter, and I think that everyone in the possible contamination area, which includes the Pacific basin from Japan across to Oregon and California, should test their own Pacific-caught seafood on a regular basis."

Where else did you read this? The answer is, in the US media, almost nowhere. Keep us going with a subscription.