The Mars Curiosity rover has taken a picture of a rock formation that looks for all the world like a spoon that is floating above the ground.

NASA has identified the spoon-like object as a ventifact, which is a rock that has been shaped by the wind, slowly sandblasted over time into its present shape, and held in place on its parent rock formation at the end of it’s handle. Mars’s lower gravity, approximately one-third that of Earth’s, has also probably helped prevent the spoon’s snapping off under it’s own weight. There are a number of other ventifacts present in the picture as well, but none quite as dramatic as the levitating Martian utensil.
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We’ve asked a lot of questions about the connection between fear and Visitor phenomena these past few weeks. This week, we’ll hear from Lee, a lifelong experiencer who confronted his fears and actually spent a night alone in the woods near Whitley’s old cabin in Upstate NY until he got what he came for: freedom from fear.

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While most of us are well aware of the extent of the loss of glacial ice in both Greenland and the Antarctic, new findings from a composite of satellite surveys have discovered that the volume of ice loss has been so dramatic in Western Antarctica that it has changed the region’s gravitational constant.
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In a growing movement around the world, an increasing number of governments are banning dolphinariums, and the capture and display of cetaceans for entertainment purposes in their countries, with many citing the inherit intelligence and sensitivity of these creatures as the reason behind these moves.

The first country to issue such a ban was Bolivia: in 2009, the government there made history by instituting the world’s first ban on the keeping of animals in circuses and other venues for public performance, of which included captive cetaceans. In the following years, similar bans were enacted by Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Greece, Hungary, India, Nicaragua, Slovenia, and Switzerland.
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