The virus that has killed 3 people and infected 39 more in Greece has been identified as a member of the human enterovirus family. Preliminary tests by Greece’s Special Infections Control Center suggest it could be Coxsackie B.

Identifying the precise strain will not make treatment any easier. Doctors can only treat the symptoms of the infection rather than the virus itself, says a spokesperson for the World Health Organization’s Communicable Disease and Surveillance Response center.

The Greek government has closed all schools and universities across the country, to try to stop the spread of the virus. Cases of infection have been reported in most regions of Greece. But it appears that the peak of the outbreak has passed.
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Ben Harder writes in Science News that Dr. Kenneth D. Frank and a handful of other scientists are trying to understand the impact of artificial light on a multitude of living creatures. We can see evidence of this ourselves, when we notice how moths tend to fly into lamps and flames. The researchers suspect that artificial night lighting disrupts the physiology and behavior of many other nocturnal animals, as well.
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Dmytro Hrodzynskyy, a Ukrainian scientist who is monitoring the site of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster warns that the levels of radiation around the destroyed reactor are risingBecause the concrete cover placed over the remains of the damaged reactor is failing. He believes the remaining fuel inside the reactor is heating up.
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Researchers have discovered that the results of safety tests on the type of genetically modified corn that is currently grown in Britain were ignored. The crop, T-25 GM, was tested in laboratory experiments on chickens. During the tests, twice as many chickens died when fed on T-25 GM corn, compared with those fed on conventional corn.

This research was overlooked when the crop was given marketing approval in 1996 by Acre – the Advisory Committee on Releases to the Environment. Acre’s chairman, Lord Alan Gray, admits the research should have been reanalyzed and that safety tests were not good enough to give a true picture of the risks involved.
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