Out There

Excellent article from OpenMinds on Night Vision UFO Video

OpenMinds does an outstanding job in general. This article is well done. More people should use night vision equipment to video the night sky. It may be that a great deal of previously unnoticed activity will be revealed. Unless these objects are spy craft that are not using FAA approved running lights, they are not only mysterious, their numbers suggest that whoever is here is really out in force. However, be aware that, as the article points out, birds can present a mysterious appearance to an infrared camera. They are relatively easy to distinguish, however, as long as the videographer has a good idea of what they look like using night vision equipment. A video of birds in flight is provided for comparison.

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This looks real, i'd have to say a B+ or an A-... The videographer has a nice calm affect. The 3 craft are very tight with stars behind them, I imagine if they were military jets (f-16's) the heat image would look far brighter than the commercial aircraft. This helps dispell the Ed Grimslay criticisim about his 'ufo's being bats,birds or insects.

This looks real, i'd have to say a B+ or an A-... The videographer has a nice calm affect. The 3 craft are very tight with stars behind them, I imagine if they were military jets (f-16's) the heat image would look far brighter than the commercial aircraft. This helps dispell the Ed Grimsley criticisim about his 'ufo's being bats,birds or insects.

The grouping of these craft (or is a single craft?) in the video above looks great. There is still the issue for me that some of these shots (not the one shown above), could quite easily be that of birds.

To say that they (birds) are relatively easy to distinguish, is not neccesarily correct in my opinion - the control footage of birds in the link is quite clearly that of...yes, birds...but without seeing some control footage of a high flying bird of prey / owl / swift / swallow / bat, etc, how are we supposed to rule them out?

We are not comparing like with like...yes, agreed the bird of prey / owl / swift / swallow is indeed a bird, obviously, but their mode of flight is quite different to that of sea gulls and geese...and could in my opinion still be mistaken for something technological.

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