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Why This Generation is LESS Healthy Than the Last One

Despite so many medical breakthroughs, increased life expectancy in the United States has NOT been accompanied by more years of perfect health. A 20-year-old today can expect to live one less healthy year over his or her lifespan than a 20-year-old a decade ago, even though life expectancy has grown. (Maybe we need more hands-on healing! NOTE: Subscribers can still listen to these interviews).

From 1970 to 2005, the probability of a 65-year-old surviving to age 85 doubled, from about a 20% chance to a 40% chance. Many researchers presumed that the same forces allowing people to live longer, including better health behaviors and medical advances, would also delay the onset of disease and allow people to spend fewer years of their lives with debilitating illness. But new research shows that the period of life spent with serious disease or loss of functional mobility has actually INCREASED in the last few decades.

Gerontologist Eileen Crimmins says, "We have always assumed that each generation will be healthier and longer lived than the prior one. However, there is substantial evidence that we have done little to date to eliminate or delay disease while we have prevented death from diseases. At the same time, there have been substantial increases in the incidences of certain chronic diseases, specifically, diabetes.

Could some of this be do to the cold, clinical atmosphere of today's hospitals? Researcher Eddie Lopez says, "Every hospital resident, intern and medical student who interacts with patients needs to learn to put aside their personal ‘baggage’ based on their own life experiences." It's the same “active listening training” taught in continuing education courses for seminarians and clergy, and has nothing to do with religion.

Diabetes: That's the disease that Anne Strieber was surprised to find that SHE had. When she found her clothes were getting too tight she thought they had all shrunk, until she realized she had gained weight due to this genetic condition that manifests in late middle age and makes it easy to gain weight and hard to lose it. She not only discovered WHY some of us have this gene, but what to do about it, and after three years of diet and exercise, she managed to lose 100 pounds--and YOU can too, if you download her famous diet book "What I Learned from the Fat Years." This isn't an advice book written by a doctor or celebrity, it's a diet book written by a REAL DIETER, who sympathizes with what you're going through that has helped thousands of people to shed those unwanted pounds.



The clinical atmosphere of hospitals? Seriously? You actually answered it in the last paragraph. How we eat has drastically changed in the last century. Too many animal based foods, sugar, and refined foods as well as too few vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. If we go back to how people ate in the 19th Century, even without totally eliminating all animal foods which would be optimum, our health, and health care costs, would vastly change.

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