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Why China is Watching Day After Tomorrow

It was recently announced that Chinese officials haveadvised all climate scientists to view the Day AfterTomorrow film, inspired byTheComing Global Superstorm by Art Bell and Whitley Strieber.Now we'velearned why: China's glaciers are melting so quickly due toglobal warming that they will disappear in 100 years,increasing floods in some places and deserts in others.

Jonathan Watts writes in The Guardian that China's glaciersaccount for 15% of the Earth?s ice, because many of theworld's highest mountain ranges are in that country. Recentfloods are already being blamed on the huge amounts of waterfrom melting glaciers. And when glaciers melt, they leavedeserts behind, where the ice once was.

Researcher Yao Tandong says, "Within 20 to 30 years, we willsee the collapse of many of the smaller glaciers. Within 60years, we can predict a very significant reduction in thevolume of high-altitude ice fields."

Robert Roy Britt writes in space.com that satellites havespotted the breakup of the Larsen B ice shelf in Antarctica,which is creating runaway glaciers and dumping large amountsof ice into the ocean. This will not only raise oceanlevels, in will further dilute the ocean with freshwater,causing the gulf stream to drop down further, bringing acolder climate to Europe.

NASA's Eric Rignot says that because the glaciers are losingice to the sea "at a rate which exceeds snowfall, there isexcess water in the ocean from the glaciers, which means sealevel is rising." This indicates that other glaciers willsoon melt "in which case it won't be small. What thesestudies are showing is that we should be concerned about that."

Chinese environmentalist Shi Yafeng says, "No one canreverse the changes to a glacier" (or an ice shelf either).

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