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Where Was the Shroud All Those Years?

?It was hidden by the Templars! - The shroud of Turin, which is supposedly the burial cloth of Jesus, seemed to surface suddenly in the late nineteenth century, which give rise to the theory that it was a modern forgery (the Catholic church created many of these "relics" in the past). Where was it all this time? William Henry asks Tim Wallace-Murphy this question in an upcoming Revelations interview!

The medieval knights known as the Templars hid and secretly worshipped the Shroud of Turin for more than 100 years after the Crusades. Despite the Catholic church's persecution of this group, the Vatican recently admitted this, which has finally solved the mystery of the Shroud's missing years.

The Shroud disappeared in 1204 during the Fourth Crusade, and did not show up again for 200 years. It is thought to have been the cloth in which Jesus was buried, although the image only emerged clearly in 1898 when a photographer developed a negative of the image. The Vatican has not declared whether it is genuine or a forgery, leaving the question to us to decide.

In the April 6th edition of the London Times, Richard Owen reports that researcher Barbara Frale has discovered a document in the Vatican archives in which Arnaut Sabbatier, a young Frenchman who entered the order in 1287, wrote that as part of his initiation he was taken to "a secret place to which only the brothers of the Temple had access" where he was shown "a long linen cloth on which was impressed the figure of a man" and instructed to kiss the feet of the image three times.

Legends have said that the Templars may have had the Holy Grail, the plate that Jesus used during the Last Supper, which is said to have magical powers, but this may have been the secret relic they were actually holding. The Grail, which religious scholars are not certain ever really existed, may have been a rumor promulgated by the Templars in order to hide their real treasure.

Radiocarbon dating tests done on the Shroud of Turin in 1988 branded it a medieval fake, but this has been challenged on the grounds that the sample was taken from an area of the shroud mended after a fire in the Middle Ages that not a part of the original cloth.

William Henry will soon interview Tim Wallace-Murphy about this story on his new show "Revelations." Look for it, coming soon on unknowncountry.com!

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