News Stories

When you DON'T want Wi-Fi

PAINT it out! - People with portable laptops are always looking for cafes and coffee shops that offer wifi. But after the "Wikileaks" scandal, where a website recently published 76,000 secret US military logs detailing military actions in Afghanistan, some offices want avoid this type of conspiracy in the future by making it IMPOSSIBLE to use the internet at work. How to do this? Use "anti wi-fi PAINT."

This new paint blocks out wireless signals, meaning that computer users can block spies without having to encrypt their messages in order to avoid being hacked. The paint contains an aluminum-iron oxide which resonates at the same frequency as wi-fi (or other radio waves), so that the airborne data is absorbed and blocked.

In BBC News, Dave Lee quotes paint project director Shin-ichi Ohkoshi as saying, "In a medical setting, you could transmit large volumes of data from a medical device, such as an endoscope, to a computer." It would also be great for theaters: "You could block phone signals from outside and stop people's phones ringing during the movie." Next he wants to weave this technology could into clothing (so that if you're sitting next to an annoying cell phone user, you will cancel his call?)

Meanwhile, internet use is going strong but the number of people posting free information on the net is waning--more of these volunteers seem to be logging out than tuning in. Analysts think the problem may be that people are tired of working for free.

Newsweek reports that about 95% of the new blogs that are launched are quickly abandoned and only about one in 4 browsers bothers to leave a comment on a site. Venerable sites like Wikipedia are recruiting for new input. As many as 90% of tweets come from 10 of Twitter users, meaning that the power of that site is much less than it used to be.

We know there's a recession on, but times are tough for us, too, and we're just not getting the support we need. You can keep using going for less than a latte a WEEK: Less than $12 gets you a 3-month subscription. So what are you waiting for? Subscribe today!

To learn more, click here and here.

Art credit: Dreamstime.com

NOTE: This news story, previously published on our old site, will have any links removed.


Subscribe to Unknowncountry sign up now