News Stories

When a Star Screams

Ever heard a star scream? Astrophysicists have detected the oscillating signal that heralds the last gasps of a star being sucked up by a previously dormant supermassive black hole.

The "screams," scientifically known as "quasiperiodic oscillations," occurred steadily every 200 seconds, but occasionally disappeared. Such signals have often been detected at smaller black holes and they're believed to emanate from material about to be sucked in.

Astrophysicist Rubens Reis says, "In order for the black hole to feed from a star that its gravity has broken apart, the remains of the star must form a disk surrounding the black hole. The disk gets heated up and we can see emissions from the disk very close to the black hole (with X-ray telescopes). As this matter is falling in, it gives a quasiperiodic wobble and that's the signal we detected."

Astronomer Jon Miller says, "You can think of it as hearing the star scream as it gets devoured, if you like." The researchers say it sounds like an ultra-low D-sharp.

Who hears the screams of "abductees?" Anne Strieber interviews them AFTER their experiences, and although she's heard one song (not in D-sharp), she hasn't heard any screams--but she's heard ABOUT them.

Anne Strieber has interviewed 23 "experiencers" about their strange encounters--in an incredibly valuable repository of information that you won't find anywhere else--and if you're a subscriber, you can listen to ALL of them!



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