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What's Your Death Day

Since the end of the world didn't happen, we really don't know. (NOTE: Subscribers can still listen to this show).

We all know our birthday, but hospice doctors know something we don't: They know our death day. It turns out our genes do too--researchers believe they have found a gene that regulates the time of day a person is likely to die (NOTE: Subscribers can still listen to this provocative interview).

This gene variant also determines whether you're a "morning person" or an "evening person." It contains three possible combinations of nucleotides: adenine-adenine (A-A), adenine-guanine (A-G), and guanine-guanine (G-G),

In the Huffington Post, Ryan Grenoble quotes neurologist Clifford Saper as saying, "This particular genotype affects the sleep-wake pattern of virtually everyone walking around. And it is a fairly profound effect so that the people who have the A-A genotype wake up about an hour earlier than the people who have the G-G genotype, and the A-Gs wake up almost exactly in the middle."

In a recent study, patients with the A-A and A-G genotypes typically died just before 11 a.m., while subjects with the G-G combination tended to die near 6 p.m.

Grenoble quotes Saper as saying, "So there is really a gene that predicts the time of day that you’ll die (NOTE: Subscribers can still listen to this show). Not the date, fortunately, but the time of day."

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