News Stories

What Happens When a Star Explodes

Using two of its new telescopes --one on the ground and one in space-- NASA have seen one of the most puzzling cosmic blasts ever observed, which seems to be the destruction of a massive star. Astronomers say they have never seen anything this bright, long-lasting and variable before. Usually, gamma-ray bursts mark the destruction of a massive star, but Flaring emissions from these events never last more than a few hours, but high-energy radiation from it continued to be seen from it for more than a week afterwards.
On the Universe Today website, Nancy Atkinson quotes astronomer Neil Gehrels as saying, "The fact that the explosion occurred in the center of a galaxy tells us it is most likely associated with a massive black hole. This solves a key question about the mysterious event." NASA scientists think the blast occurred when a star wandered two closely to its galaxy's central black hole, causing intense forces to tear the star apart. Gas continues to stream from the hole it left behind. She quotes astronomer Andrew Fruchter as saying, "We know of objects in our own galaxy that can produce repeated bursts, but they are thousands to millions of times less powerful than the bursts we are seeing now. This is truly extraordinary."

If you're interested in the extraordinary (especially UFOs), be sure to come to Nashville in June for our delightful Dreamland Festival. Marla Frees will do psychic readings, Jim Marrs will hold court in the local beer garden, and Anne Strieber will be there to talk about all your personal experiences. The theme is "What is to Come," the provocative title of Whitley's Communion sequel, which will be published in early 2012 (NOTE: Subscribers can still listen to these shows).



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