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Was Princess Di Murdered? MI6 Agent Speaks Out

Nexus - In the January issue of Nexus Magazine, there is a sworn statement by Richard Tomlinson, a former MI6 officer, stating that British Intelligence is hiding important information about Princess Diana?s death.

According to his story, in 1992 he was working in Eastern Europe as part of an operation trying to smuggle advanced Soviet weaponry out of the disintegrating Soviet Union. Meetings between agents working on this operation were often held at the Ritz Hotel, in Paris, from which Diana and her lover, Dodi Al Fayed, took their fatal limousine ride. In intelligence documents he saw while working on the Soviet operation, he noted that one of their paid informants was a security officer who worked at the Ritz, Henri Paul, who drove the car that crashed, killing Diana and Dodi, as well as himself. This means that the driver, once thought to be only an employee of Dodi's father, who owned the Ritz, was actually an undercover British spy as well.

Tomlinson remembers reading a file describing a plan to assassinate the then Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic by crashing his limousine. The plan was to cause Milosevic's limo to crash in a tunnel, because the concrete walls meant that the crash would be violent enough so that there would be no survivors. A tunnel would also reduce the possibility of casual witnesses. It was suggested that one way to cause the crash would be to disorient the driver by using a strobe flash gun, which has been used by MI6 to disorient enemy helicopter pilots and terrorists. This scenario is remarkably similar to the circumstances and eyewitness accounts of the crash that killed Princess Diana.

Richard Tomlinson states that while in the British Intelligence Service, he learned there were links between MI6 and the Royal Household. MI6 routinely looks for and reports any terrorist threats against the Royal Family and asks other agencies, like the CIA, to keep an eye on them during foreign trips. The Princess of Wales did not like to have bodyguards with her, so they often requested this type of help on her trips abroad. He also learned that one of the photographers who routinely followed Diana was a part-time member of MI6.

After he testified before the French judge who was investigating the crash, Tomlinson was arrested in his Paris hotel at gunpoint and received a broken rib in the scuffle. He was taken to French Intelligence Headquarters and interrogated for 38 hours. After his release, his laptop computer was confiscated and passed it on to MI6.

In August 1998, he boarded a flight from New Zealand, headed for Australia, where he was going to give a TV interview about the Diana incident. While waiting for takeoff, he was told that his travel papers were not in order and that he would have to leave the plane. When he got back to his hotel, the New Zealand Intelligence Service took him into custody and again took his computer.

He was also scheduled to be interviewed on NBC TV in the U.S. When he arrived at JFK airport, he was told to surrender his passport and was taken into custody. He was kept handcuffed for seven hours while being photographed and fingerprinted, then he was served with deportation papers and put on a plane home. The immigration officers he dealt with openly admitted they were acting under orders from the CIA.

He is now legally banned from entering France in order, he feels, to prevent him from giving further testimony.

After the unexplained assassination of John F. Kennedy, most of us in the U.S. wouldn't be too surprised by accusations that a rebel Princess like Diana was gotten out of the way.

Source: Nexus, Dec. 2000-Jan. 2001 issue.



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