News Stories

Violent Teens

New research shows us that kids who are raised by gay parents are doing OK, and so are in-vitro (IVF) kids. But some teens are violent--what makes them that way?

A new study has discovered that children conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) perform at least as well as their peers on academic tests at all ages from grade 3 to 12. This is good because it means that when they become teens, they're less likely to be violent.

Another study reveals that almost a third of adolescents aged 12 to 17 participated in 3 violent behaviors over the past year. Almost 23% of adolescents reported having participated in a serious fight at school or work; 16% reported involvement in group-against-group fighting, and almost 8% reported attacking others with intent to seriously hurt them. What's making our teens so violent?

Overall, male adolescents were more likely to engage in violent behaviors than females, but the study found other demographic and socioeconomic factors were also associated with an adolescent's risk for violent behaviors. One of the key factors seems to be family income: Adolescents from families with higher annual incomes are less likely to engage in violent behaviors than those from lower income families. But the biggest factor was how teens do in school: Academic performance is associated with risk for participating in violent behaviors measured. Adolescents with "A" averages in school were less than half as likely to be involved in violent behaviors as adolescents earning "D" averages in school.

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