News Stories

Too Wet?or Not Enough

According to a recent study, recent hurricane seasons, triggered by global warming, did a lot more than spread misery and financial woe in Florida and New Orleans. When four hurricanes crossed the state of Florida in 2005, the huge rainfall of rainfall that accompanied them may have caused a fish-killing "red tide," due to runoff from farms. Red Tides are caused by nitrogen-rich fertilizers washing from farm fields into lakes and the ocean. The nitrogen spurs high algae growth, blocking sunlight and causing fish to smother.

Meanwhile, environmentalists have gotten a setback, as the Supreme Court just voted to weaken the federal protections under the Clean Water Act for more than half of the nation's remaining wetlands and streams, putting many of those waters at risk for pollution and destruction. Big business hates the wetlands protection laws, because they set aside certain areas that cannot be built on. Wetlands protect the areas of land next to them from storms, floods, and tidal damage. The plants that grow in them help to filter pollutants in the water.

Art credit: gimp-savvy.com

Where did Whitley and Art get the information that forms the basis for their groundbreaking book, which was made into the hit film The Day After Tomorrow? Only those in the know have the Key to this secret. Don't count on the government to prevent global warming?there are many important ways that YOU can do. To learn some of them, click here and scroll down.You can also fight climate change by supporting those of us who get the REAL news out about what's going on: subscribe today. And if you want to know what's REALLY happening, be among the very first people to read Whitley's new novel that tells it all: The Grays. click here to pre-order a copy TODAY.

To learn more, click here and here.

NOTE: This news story, previously published on our old site, will have any links removed.


Subscribe to Unknowncountry sign up now