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There May be Water on the Moon

If there was water on the moon, we could colonize it (and take an elevator there). Well, there just may be: Traces of water have been detected within the crystalline structure of mineral samples from the lunar highland upper crust obtained during the Apollo missions.

The lunar highlands are thought to represent the original crust, crystallized from a magma ocean on a mostly molten early moon. Over the last five years, spacecraft observations and new lab measurements of Apollo lunar samples have overturned the long-held belief that the moon is bone-dry. The new findings indicate that the early moon was wet and that water there was not substantially lost during the moon's formation.

Researcher Youxue Zhang says, "Because these are some of the oldest rocks from the moon, the water is inferred to have been in the moon when it formed. These results seem to contradict the predominant lunar formation theory--that the moon was formed from debris generated during a giant impact between Earth and another planetary body, approximately the size of Mars" because the impact would have caused all the water to evaporate.

"The surprise discovery of this work is that in lunar rocks, even in nominally water-free minerals such as plagioclase feldspar, the water content can be detected."

Once we colonize the moon (and start mining it for Helium III), will we use it as a platform to go further into space? What WE want to know is, have any Visitors from out there come our way? We're not sure that the Visitors are from another planet (they may be from a parallel universe), but we know they're HERE because Anne Strieber has interviewed a large group of "contactees" (in a totally unique repository of information) who have told her about their incredible experiences IN THEIR OWN WORDS. If you subscribe today, you can listen to all of these fascinating conversations!



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