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8 to 10 Million to Experience Sandy-Related Power Failures

Hurricane Sandy is weakening and moving faster than anticipated. A computer model developed by an engineer at The Johns Hopkins University is now predicting fewer power outages than initially expected. Seth Guikema is predicting that an overall cumulative total of 8 to 10 million people will lose power in the wake of the hurricane, based on the last storm track and intensity forecast at 2 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, Oct. 30.

It is important to note that the computer model predicts cumulative outages, not peak outages. Cumulative means the total count of anyone who has lost power, versus peak, which is the number of people without power at any one point in time. For instance, in Maryland, the local utility company reported approximately 290,000 cumulative power outages as of 10:30 a.m. on Monday, Oct. 29, but their peak was approximately 210,000 because they were actively restoring outages while new outages were occurring.

As of October 31, 6 million people remained without power along the coast where Sandy made landfall. These outages are concentrated in New York and New Jersey.


They're calling Sandy a superstorm. In 1998, Whitley had never HEARD of climate change until the Master of the Key burst into his hotel room and explained the dangers ahead. Whitley then told the world.



Did you mean 7 million people without power?

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