News Stories

Some People are Always On

Matt Richtel writes in The New York Times that information overload causes a "high" similar to the kind you get with drugs. This makes the news addictive, so people can't get enough of it. Researchers call this the Always On syndrome.

People who are Always On get frustrated with long-term projects, and thrive on the constant news fixes they get from checking e-mail or voice mail or answering the phone. Some of them even use their Palm Pilots to exchange instant messages with someone else sitting in the same meeting, rather than speak to them directly. They're into multitasking, like talking on the phone while reading their e-mail.

Researcher John Ratey says, "It's like a dopamine squirt to be connected. It takes the same pathway as our drugs of abuse and pleasure. It's an addiction. Without it, we are in withdrawal."

Some of us are addicted to finding out the truth about UFOs?and Whitley can show you plenty of facts.

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