News Stories

Privacy: A Thing of the Past

Privacy International in the U.K. has given out its sixthannual Big Brother Awards, in the form of a golden statue ofa boot stomping on a head. They're mailed out, since no onehas ever shown up to collect one in person.

Michelle Delio writes in wired.com that the awards are givenout for Worst Public Servant, Most Invasive Company, MostAppalling Project, Most Heinous Government Organization andLifetime Menace and winners are selected by a panel ofexperts consisting of lawyers, academics, consultants,journalists and civil rights activists from over 300 peopleand organizations nominated by the public.

Lloyds Bank won for telling customers they have go to theirlocal branch offices with a photo ID or have their bankaccounts frozen.

The Department for Transport won for its electronicvehicle-identification program, known as the Spy in theDashboard, which will put microprocessor chips into cars.The chips will automatically report speeding, illegalparking and other offenses to the police.

British Gas was named the Most Invasive Company, after itdeclared that a privacy act prevented it from helping anelderly couple who were found dead of hypothermia in theirhome last winter, weeks after their gas service was cut offdue to nonpayment of a $255 bill. They said the actprevented them from reporting the situation to socialservices agencies that could have helped the couple restoretheir heat.

Simon Davies, the director of Privacy International, says,"The proclaimed need for protection of children and thefight against terrorism is often shamelessly used as thepretext for privacy invasion."

Privacy is an alien idea for the visitors.RogerLeir is the unsung hero who removes alien implants frompatients' bodies. His new DVD and VHS are NOT for the faintof heart. For the first time, actual implant removalsurgeries are shown as they happen.

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