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Predicting the Future with Random Numbers?

The Global ConsciousnessProject is in the process of developing data that suggeststhat there is a level of human emotion or thought that cancollectively affect random number generators, and that it isat least somewhat predictive of large scale negative events,especially those that are human-generated, such as theattack on the US World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.

If the data remains consistent, then it could be thatscientists will be able to predict the future. Moreimportantly, it will mean that each of us, on some level,knows at least enough about the future to sense whensomething big is about to happen. Individually, thisawareness is apparently quite weak. Collectively, though, ifscientists can find no conventional explanation, then itwould seem that it is measurably strong.

Of course, it is also possible that something that is notdirectly related to the human mind may be involved, that issomehow sensitive to events transpiring in human life.

There is now a body of results that suggest that very publicand intensely felt events affect the random numbergenerators in measurable ways. Not only did they cease torecord randomly before and during the 911 events, thiseffect has also been seen at other times. For example, whenan estimated one billion people worldwide watched thefuneral of Princess Diana on September 6, 1997, a consistentand measurable deviation was posted.

The project had its origins in the work of Professor RobertJahn at Princeton in the 1970s. Dr. Jahn attempted to devisescientific means of studying such things as telepathy,telekinesis and ESP, using instruments that would providehim with quantifiable results over repeated trials. Hisexperiments attempted to determine if human thought alonecould affect the randomness of a random number generator.

His method was to ask passing strangers to concentrate onhis random number generator. The results were bizarre,providing convincing evidence that the intervention of themind could indeed affect a random number generator.

Dr. Roger Nelson, also at Princeton, found that people couldaffect a random number generator during meditation, and doat a convincing level of statistical significance.

It was out of this work that the idea of the GlobalConsciousness Project was born. At present, there are 65random number generators around the world, all feeding theirresults into a computer at Princeton, which keeps a runningtab of results, that automatically appear on the project?swebsite about ten minutes after they are derived.

A similar project at Goldsmith University in England hasfailed to generate results as consistent as those beingreported by the GCP, and skeptics claim that they can,themselves, be explained by the fact that any group ofrandom number generators will, from time to time, generatenumbers in less random patterns.

However, Nelson and his colleagues respond that theirresults are consistently show a connection between lessrandom numbers and dramatic events.

Physicist Dr. Ervin Laszlo postulates in his book, Science andthe Akashic Record, that there exists a field that recordsall knowledge in the universe, and that quantum physicsoffers a plausible explanation for what have heretofore beencalled ?paranormal? phenomena. Specifically, meditation canmake the body?s natural magnetic field become ?nonlocal,?meaning that the electrons it contains are no longer in anyspecific place, but able to gather information across all oftime and space.

The most recentevents tohave affected the Global Consciousness Project?s system havebeen the Indian Ocean Tsunami, New Years, and the Iraq Election.

How true is all this? Certainly, the inability ofresearchers at Goldsmith University to duplicate GCP resultssuggest that there are problems. Dr. Nelson refused aninterview request from Whitley Strieber.

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