News Stories

NEW Bermuda Triangle Sucks Up Famous Fashion Designer

The Bermuda Triangle (NOTE: Subscribers can still listen to this show) is an area in the Atlantic Ocean between Miami, Bermuda and Puerto Rico where many ships are said to have "disappeared." Another Bermuda-like Triangle is the Devil's Sea, in the Pacific near Japanese islands (which are now being claimed by China). Japanese myths tell of dragon serpents that attacked and carried off entire fishing vessels.

Now a third Triangle has surfaced, located near the islands of Los Roques, off the coast of Venezuela, again in the Pacific--only this one takes down PLANES flying over it.

On the Helium website, Terrence Aym writes: "New attention has focused in the mysterious region after the bizarre disappearance of renowned international fashion designer Vittorio Missoni's aircraft in the Venezuela Triangle." Missoni's aircraft "vanished just a half hour after take off on Jan. 4, and days later there is still no trace of the aircraft--or any of the individuals that were on board. "

A hotel owner on the islands said he last saw the plane--a twin-engine BN-2 Islander built in 1968--entering a bank of clouds. The plane entered the clouds and seemingly vanished from the face of the Earth."

Is there any scientific explanation for these disappearances? Methane may be the culprit. Aym reports that, in a research paper published in the American Journal of Physics, researchers Joseph Monaghan and David May "hypothesized that large methane bubbles rising from the ocean floor might account for many, if not all, of the mysterious disappearances of ships and aircraft at specific locales around the world.

"Any ships caught within the methane mega-bubble immediately lose all buoyancy and sink to the bottom of the ocean. If the bubbles are big enough and possess a high enough density they can also knock aircraft out of the sky with little or no warning. Aircraft falling victim to these methane bubbles will lose their engines-perhaps igniting the methane surrounding them-and immediately lose their lift as well, ending their flights by diving into the ocean and swiftly plummeting to the sea bottom. In most cases, little or no wreckage would be found by searchers."

Since climate change is causing the oceans to heat up, releasing methane gas that has been trapped on the ocean floor, there will be MORE of these disappearances in the future (NOTE: Subscribers can still listen to this show too!).

In 1998, Whitley Strieber had never heard of climate change, but the Master of the Key burst into his hotel room in Toronto and told him all about it, which led to his bestselling book "Superstorm."



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