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Metallic Orbs Found in Hidden Chamber under Mexican Pyramid

Remote-controlled robots are exploring previously unknown rooms beneath the Temple of the Feathered Serpent at Teotihuacan  The probes have uncovered hundreds of metallic yellow orbs between 4 and 12 centimeters across.

According to a release from Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, the spheres appear to have originally covered in pyrite, a yellow-colored mineral popularly known as 'Fools Gold," which oxidized over thousands of years to become an amber mineral crust called jarosite.

The purpose of the orbs is unknown, but their exact locations are being mapped, and it will soon be possible to compare their positions to maps of the sky from the distant past, and if there is a match to perhaps determine a date that was meaningful to the pyramid builders. This might help archaeologists to understand more of the mysteries of Teotihuacan, which was suddenly abandoned in 700AD after at least 2,000 years of occupation. There is evidence of extensive fires in the site at the time of abandonment.

The tunnel where the orbs were found was sealed off around 1,800 years ago, and rediscovered in 2003. Mexico's National Institute of Archaeology spearheaded the exploration and announced the results in a press release. To read the Spanish version, click here. To read a Google Translate version, click here.

Unknowncountry has a wonderful archive of stories about lost cities available for free by using our search engine. But for the richest experience, subscribers can enjoy such gems as rare interviews with the legendary Sir Laurence Gardner who in his lifetime was one of the great experts on the lost past.

Where else are you going to read a story like this or find this depth of information? Maybe a few places, but only in our story will you find the vitally important material about the possibility that they may represent a star map. Why not help keep this important website going and, above all, ENJOY all of the excitement of our wonderful archive! To start the orb rolling, click here.
 


I find it highly unlikely that the jarosite formed from pyrite in that cave. Jarosite usually is found in acid sulfate soil environments (not subaerial), which commonly are found in coastal locations (in other words, a darn long way from Teotehuacan). The greater likelihood is that the jarosite lumps were mined in a coastal region and brought (as jarosite) to Teotehuacan, probably valued for their yellow color.

Edited to add: deposits also exist in Chihuahua, but that's a pretty good distance from Teotehuacan as well.

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