News Stories

Many Worlds

Is the "many worlds" theory of parallel universes correct? Even cosmologist George Ellis, who came up with the theory, isn't sure that HE agrees with it!

The theory forms one of the bedrocks of quantum physics, and it also helps explain Dark Matter, which is one of the main questions CERN is seeking to answer. But the problem with the theory is the theory that everything that CAN happen DOES happen (in some parallel universe).

In New Scientist, Amanda Gefter quotes researcher Andrei Linde as saying, "How do you compare infinities?" Quantum physicist Raphael Bousso thinks we need a mathematical tool that tells us how to define relative probabilities, but finding the right measure for the multiverse isn't easy. His solution? A probability theory based on our observation of only one universe (our own).

Meanwhile, It's not quantum entanglement, but it's still strange: Venus and Earth are linked, in that Earth exerts a pull on the center of Venus, controlling its spin.

Whenever the orbits of these 2 planets come close together, Venus always turns the same "face" to us, indicating that Earth's gravity is subtly tugging on it, which means that the core of that planet could be solid, rather than liquid. This especially interesting to astronomers, because they don't have much information about the interior of Venus. In New Scientist, Rachel Courtland quotes Gerard Caudal as saying, "For [this] to be possible, there should be something that the gravity of the Earth could grasp."

There's a lot of information to be found out there that's hard to grasp, but we're here to help, and if you need MORE help, come see us in person in Nashville on June 25-27. The first 25 people to buy tickets will get a FREE DVD of LAST YEAR'S Festival, but don't wait, this special offer will fill up soon!

To learn more, click here and here.

NOTE: This news story, previously published on our old site, will have any links removed.