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Juggling Changes the Brain

The brains of jugglers are larger than those of non-jugglers, but if you stop juggling, your brain will return to normal size.

Researchers gave brain scans to 12 people who had learned to juggle and found that the areas of gray matter in their brains had grown. Grey matter is the part of the brain used for higher-level thinking. But three months later, when they stopped juggling, their brains were back to normal.

Researcher Vanessa Strumling would like to find out how this change could be made permanent. She's found that musicians have more gray matter than non-musicians, and that, unlike jugglers, they retain their larger brains. She says, "It would be interesting to know at what point this acquired gray matter can be retained. Does it mean you need to continuously practice the acquired skill to retain it, or at some point have you done enough to retain it?"

Juggling takes concentration and so does meditation. We've got a book that Whitley calls "among the most powerful and profound meditations I have ever experienced. Wayne Dyer, in creating this, has reached a new level of wisdom. Simple, clear, powerful, with a phenomenal CD."

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