News Stories

It's Not Easy Being Green

Patrick Moore help found Greenpeace in 1971, but today he's pushing GM foods and nuclear power plants. And the Sierra Club is being taken over by anti-immigration activists. What's going on here?

Drake Bennett writes in wired.com that despite campaigning in the past against nuclear testing, Moore joined the other side in 1986. Today he supports many of the interests he once fought against, such as the timber and plastics industries. He says the Amazon rain forest doesn't need protection, the Three Gorges Dam in China was a great idea, and that opposition to genetically-modified foods is dangerous.

At a public hearing in Boston City Hall last year, Moore said, "There is not a public benefit to be derived from a ban on PVC (dioxins)." He criticized people who "hijacked a considerable portion of the environmental movement back in the mid-'80s and who have become very clever at using green language to cloak campaigns that have more to do with anti-industrialism, antiglobalization, anticorporate, all of those things which are basically political campaigns."

Brad Knickerbocker writes in The Christian Science Monitor that The Sierra Club has become divided between those who are against immigration and those who aren't. One group believes that population growth contributes greatly to environmental degradation, since more people mean more pollution and greater consumption of natural resources. Civil rights lawyer Morris Dees calls this the "greening of hate." This same group is also alienating hunters and fishermen, who traditionally support environmental causes, by being strongly for animal rights.

Knickerbocker points out that John Muir, who founded the Sierra Club, was an immigrant from Scotland.

One little known fact is that many abductees have been given messages about the environment.

To learn more, click here and here.

NOTE: This news story, previously published on our old site, will have any links removed.


Subscribe to Unknowncountry sign up now