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Ice Blocks From the Sky

Spanish scientist Jesus Martinez-Frias says global warming may be to blame for the mysterious giant blocks of ice which fall from cloudless skies, crushing cars and houses. When these ice blocks started appearing a decade ago, it was thought they were frozen waste jettisoned from airplanes, but tests showed that wasn?t the source. "I'm not worried that a block of ice might fall on your head?but that great blocks of ice are forming where they shouldn't exist," he says. "Components of the atmosphere, like ozone and water, are changing in different levels of the atmosphere?We think these signs could be evidence of climate change.

"We're not talking about hoaxes," Martinez-Frias says. "It's very easy to tell real and false ice blocks apart. It's not water from airplane toilets...Its isotopic composition bears the signature...of Iberian rain."

Global warming means that contrails, which are ice clouds composed of crystallized vapor trails, remain in the atmosphere longer, because the lower atmosphere is getting warmer, while the upper atmosphere is colder. Pieces of these icy contrails fall through the atmosphere, getting bigger and bigger, and end up smashing through a car windshield. The first ice block found this year in Spain was discovered lying in a field by a farmer riding by on his tractor. It weighed over 35 pounds.

Three others were found later, bringing the world total over the last decade to more than 50. But Martinez-Frias thinks only around a fifth of them are ever found. An ice block weighing around 440 pounds has been found in Brazil, and others have been found in Mexico and Australia.

When one layer of the atmosphere heats up, due to the greenhouse effect, why does another layer cool down? Whitley Strieber explains it all for you in ?The Coming Global Superstorm,? now only 9.95 for an autographed hardcover, click here and scroll down.

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