News Stories

Ice Block Just Misses Elderly Woman

The same conditions that recently produced a hole in the sky in Alabama have led to yet another giant ice block falling to Earth, this time in New Zealand.

Patrick Gower and Natasha Harris write in the New Zealand Herald that a football-sized block of ice smashed through the roof and into the kitchen of 80-year-old Jan Robertson, who says, "There was this terrific bang like goodness knows what. I could have been in there cutting up vegetables? There was debris on the toaster, on the kettle?it was everywhere."

She called the fire department, and fireman John Sweeney says they were skeptical "until we saw it for ourselves."

This happened the previous week in the same neighborhood, when an ice block fell on the house of Pat Theobald, who says, "?There wasn't a cloud in the sky."

Robertson assumes the ice fell from a plane, since they're in a flight path and often hear jets overhead. She says, "Where else could it come from?"

These ice blocks have been falling from the sky all over the world in the last few years. Planes are often seen overhead when the blocks fall, leading to the conclusion that they are emptying their chemical toilets while flying overhead. However, planes do not do this and no traces of chemicals have been found in any of the ice.

This phenomenon is caused by global warming. When the lower atmosphere gets warmer, the layer of air just above it, where planes fly, gets colder. This can cause contrails to freeze, dropping to Earth as blocks of ice. These ice blocks have even crashed into bedrooms, just missing sleeping people.

If data on these ice blocks was gathered by an international agency, planes could be ordered to fly at a lower altitude, so their contrails wouldn't freeze. It's already been discovered that contrails turn into cirrus clouds, which trap heat rising from the Earth, increasing global warming. If planes fly 6,000 feet lower, it will reduce contrails by 47%.

Atlantis is so controversial that mainstream archaeologists risk their careers simply by uttering the word. On Dreamland this week, Shirley Andrews says, "Let's stop debating whether or not the ruins are there. They are. Let's take a look at them and find the lessons they have for us today." Don?t miss this exciting show!

NOTE: This news story, previously published on our old site, will have any links removed.


Subscribe to Unknowncountry sign up now