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How Can We Track That Cash?

Jihadist terror organizations have set economic terrorism as their new target, intending to harm and paralyze Western economies, the US in particular. A terrorism researcher who monitored internet sites hosted by terrorist and terrorism-supporting organizations over a number of years concludes: "For the Jihadists, the present economic crisis signifies an ideal opportunity and platform to leverage an economic terrorist campaign."

Israeli researcher Gabriel Weimann says this goal was set in motion with the September 11 attack on the Twin Towers, when Osama bin Laden stated on the video tapes that he sent out that these attacks mostly damaged the United States' economic base and that these attacks, which cost $500,000 to carry out, cost the U.S. $500 billion.

Weimann also thinks that the armed struggle against the US in Iraq and Afghanistan is aimed at prolonging American expenditure on maintaining forces in these countries, and not necessarily at military defeat. The jihadists believe that this would help drain America's financial resources and eventually critically damage the American economy. Therefore, they aim to make the US open as many military fronts around the world as possible.

There have been a lot of earthquakes and bad weather in poor areas recently, and when we give money to ravished areas like Haiti, or when the government gives billions of dollars to war torn areas in Iraq and Afghanistan, how do we know the cash isn't just going into someone's pocket? Charities and NATO are now using hi tech methods to make sure this doesn't happen.In Afghanistan, we are paying local tribesmen cash so that they will not join up with that other employer: the Taliban. The US could even be supporting the same insurgents our troops are fighting if the aid we've given them for building roads, picking up trash and cleaning canals is diverted to the enemy.

Or mafia-style fraud could be what is really taking place, in that this cash may be paying for nonexistent jobs with no-show workers. In Wired.com, Nathan Hodge quotes Mercy Corp.'s John Stephens as saying, "The moment you turn away for a second, that's when corruption can blossom. Especially with cash-for-work, because there

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