News Stories

How to be (Somewhat) Invisible

WE may not yet be able to become invisible, but scientists have succeeded in "cloaking" an object perfectly for the first time, making it invisible to microwaves. Many "invisibility cloak" efforts have been made, but they've all reflected some light, making the illusion incomplete.

Microwaves (which are longer wavelengths than we can see, which is why you don't notice them when you cook something in your microwave oven). The next step is to move the work to different wavelengths--ones which we can see.

And the illusion only works from one direction. In BBC News, Jason Palmer quotes researcher David Smith as saying, "It's like the card people in Alice in Wonderland. If they turn on their sides you can't see them but they're obviously visible if you look from the other direction." So we could shield our soldiers and weapons this way only if they didn't move! Obviously, more progress is needed.

And Smith has hope--he says, "I think (this is) something that a lot of people can build on. Everything in this field is going to come down to what you can make, what you can design. And I think this steps up the design."

It takes a special kind of person to "see" what's going on. For instance, nobody noticed the Master of the Key until he burst into Whitley's hotel room in 1998 (and Whitley thought he was the room service waiter at first). MOTKE convinced Whitley he was real when he told him incredible things, which turned out to be TRUE.