News Stories

Hate Your Face? Get a Transplant!

Surgical techniques already exist that would allow doctors to transplant faces from one person to another, but no one has yet dared to do it. At first, this would be done for patients whose faces have been disfigured by cancer, burns or accidents, but it?s likely that in the future, it would be used by people who simply want to look better or look like someone else.

It's difficult to reconstruct a patient's face, because it needs to be able to move in order to convey expressions and feelings. Especially in badly-burned patients, skin grafts cause the face to have a mask-like quality. But transplants would involve muscle and nerves as well as skin, so the resulting face could move normally.

A face transplant would give the patient new lips, chin, ears, nose, skin and bone from a recently deceased person. Blood vessels, arteries and veins would also be taken from the donor's face. The recipient would have to have their own face, facial muscles, skin and subcutaneous fat removed. One problem is getting faces to transplant. Plastic surgeon Peter Butler says that "while people would, in general, accept a face transplant if they required it, they would actually not be willing to donate."

Christine Piff, of ?Let's Face It,? a support group for people who are facially disfigured, says she?s not sure she?d want a face transplant. "There's a hesitancy on my part, thinking that I would be wearing another face that didn't belong to me.?

Psychologist Aric Sigman says, "What we don't know is what happens when they wake up with someone else's face."

You may be happy with your face but want to change your body in order to become a more spiritual being. Joseph Chilton Pearce shows how to do it in ?The Biology of Transcendence,? click here.

NOTE: This news story, previously published on our old site, will have any links removed.


Subscribe to Unknowncountry sign up now