News Stories

A Good Home to Grow Up In

If you want your child's lungs and brain to develop in theright way, your home must be quiet, peaceful?and not tooclean.

Researchers Stephen Petrill and Robert Plomin collected theresults of intelligence tests on children and found thatgrowing up in a chaotic, noisy, disorganized house is badfor a child's developing brain. Plomin says, "It just makessense. If a kid is in a really chaotic home, it's hard toimagine that they can learn in a normal way. Theirsurroundings just aren't subtle enough for them to teaseapart the world." They think that when the home environment is stressful, the child's genes won't attain thehighest possible level of intelligence. This may be onereason why the children of poorer parents score lower intests; they often live in more crowded and noisy environments.

Parents who keep a spotless house may be triggering asthmain their children, because they're exposing them to fumesfrom solvents and cleaning products. Furniture polishes, airfresheners and new carpets are some of the worst causes ofasthma.

Also, research has shown that early exposure to germs booststhe immune system, making children less susceptible toasthma and childhood illnesses.

Dr. Matthew Hallsworth says, "There has already been a lotof debate about whether outdoor air pollution may increasethe risk of developing asthma. This study reminds us that weshould also consider indoor air quality and how it mayaffect the health of our lungs."

If schools really cared about our kids, they'd teach themhow to makethefuture their own. There is order to the universe, a way inwhich life flows. The ancient art of dowsing?which is muchmore than a way to look for water?gives us the key totapping into the flow of the universe for health, wealth,and positive change. And now all this wisdom is onsale!

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