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First Human Genes Still Alive in India

In Tamil Nadu, on India's East Coast, geneticists Spencer Wells and R.M. Pitchappan have found strains of genes that were present in early man when he first left Africa 60,000 years ago. When these first humans came to that part of India, some of them decided to stay and their progeny are still there today. "These gene pools are unique and very accurately map the path a population has taken, leaving behind original communities to grow into independent groups but with a common ancestor," says Pitchappan.

He found the gene markers M130, which were in humans 50,000 years ago, and M20, in humans 35,000 years ago, in the local people of Tamil Nadu. He found M172 markers as well, which are also present in the people of Pakistan's Balochistan province, as well as M17, which are found in some Central Asians. The researchers believe there were three waves of migration around that time, as early man went from Africa to the Middle East, to India, then on to Australia.

Author Graham Hancock has been studying a submerged city in the Tamil Nadu area and thinks the civilization that built it may predate the Sumerians in present-day Iraq, long thought to be the first human civilization. His explorations show that Tamil legends about ancient floods may have been true. This culture is one of many, around the world, with legends about an ancient flood that wiped out much of mankind.

Tidal waves of 400 feet or more could have swallowed up the ancient port city any time between 17,000 and 7,000 years ago, during the last Ice Age, taking all evidence of early man?s migrations with them. The underwater city has man-made structures such as horseshoe-shaped building sites. At low tide, some brick structures can even be seen sticking out of the water. In the last few decades, evidence of ancient sunken cities has been discovered along the coastlines of countries from Japan to Cuba.

Did prehistoric man navigate the world out of sight of land?knowing full well he could never go home again?

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