News Stories

Fire in the Lake

Methane is bubbling out of the bottoms of Arctic lakes, to the extent that, if you put a match to the surface of one of them, they catch on FIRE.

Some of it seems to be coming--not from the bottom mud--but from deeper geologic reservoirs that contain hundreds of times more methane than is in the atmosphere now. Due to Arctic melt, this methane--which has been safely secured by a covering of permafrost in the past, is now bubbling up to the surface, leaving open holes big enough to be seen from an airplane.

The same phenomenon is occurring closer to home: in Goldstream Lake in Canada. These underwater reservoirs contain hundreds of times more methane than is in the atmosphere now. Methane is a deadly greenhouse gas that produces 25 times more heat than carbon dioxide, unless you burn it first.

The March 25th edition of the Daily Mail quotes researcher Katey Walter as saying, "If we could only capture it, it would make a great energy source."

Lakes burning throughout the coldest areas of the Earth--This is an incredible image to contemplate, one that could become a reality soon. When the lake ice fully melts this summer, an unknown amount of methane will be released into the atmosphere. Methane holds heat far more efficiently than carbon dioxide, and is among the most dangerous of global warming gasses.

How will the world end? After Noah's ark finally reached land, God promised Noah that he would not flood the earth again, that it would be "the fire next time," and in this case, BOTH could be true. Read all about it in Whitley's new e-book!



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