News Stories

Don't Use Your Cell Phone in a Storm

Fifteen tourists in China were injured because one of theircell phones was struck by lightning while they were walkingon a section of the Great Wall. It acted as a lightning rod,injuring all of them.

A hospital worker says of one of the injured men: "He felt alittle dizzy, but he's been discharged now." Following thefreak accident, signs have been put up along the Great Wallwarning people to turn off their cell phones duringlightning storms.

Atmospheric scientist Liu Shuhua says, "The electromagneticwaves emitted by mobile phones are quite good conductors ofelectricity."

What does it feel like to be struck by lightning? MikePendergast says, "The last thing I remember was an extremelybright light which lit up everything around me." He began tohave strange sensations in his hands, and cold water feltlike it was hot. He says, "I occasionally will writebackwards when I get tired."

Emergency physician Mary Ann Cooper says, "When lightninghits a person, often what we see is sort of short-circuitingof the electrical systems of the body?Often, the outside ofthe person will look reasonably the same as it was before."

Here's a tip most people don't know: If you can't get toshelter, crouch down with your heels together so that as thecurrent comes through the ground, it will move up throughyour foot and ankle and down the other foot into the ground.If your feet aren't touching, the current can come up intoyour body. And turn off your cell phone!

Is there such a thing ascoincidence?Ray Fowler made a ten-year study of his experiences ofamazing coincidences and paranormal experiences and came tothe conclusion that time is an illusion.

Photo credits: http://www.freeimages.co.uk/

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