News Stories

Close Call in November

The Sun nearly shut down the Earth last November when a wave of massive explosions on the Sun threatened power grids all over the world. This solar flare, which hasn't been measured until now, was so violent that satellite detectors were unable to record its true size. It shot charged electrical particles and gas into space at two million miles per hour. Scientists in New Zealand say it almost caused unimaginable destruction.

Chris Millar writes that their calculations show the flare's X-ray radiation was equivalent to that of 5,000 suns. The harmful radiation was absorbed by the magnetosphere, a protective layer around the earth which is growing weaker because the Earth's poles are about to flip. One of the scientists describes the power of the flare as being greater than "every nuclear warhead being detonated at once."

David Whitehouse writes in bbcnews.com that no one realized how big the flare was when it first exploded, because satellite detectors were blinded by its radiation, but the scientists have estimated its size by studying how the x-rays hit the Earth's atmosphere.

The Earth didn?t take a direct hit from the flare?if it had, satellites could have been damaged that affected every radio, TV and cell phone signal and power grid on Earth. It could have also been bad news for the astronauts on the International Space Station. Last October and November, as reported in unknowncountry.com, the Sun began an incredible increase in solar activity, producing huge flares from the most active sunspot region ever seen. Day after day, the Sun sent billions of tons of charged particles out into space. But on November 4, just as Active Region 486 was rotating away from the Earth, it sent out the most extraordinary solar flare in history. If the Sun hadn?t been rotating away from us, we would have taken a direct hit. Researcher Neil Thomson says, "This makes it more than twice as large as any previously recorded flare. If the accompanying particle and magnetic storm had been aimed at the Earth, the damage to some satellites and electrical networks could have been considerable."

In dangerous times, we need to learn how to make the most out of our Limitless Minds. On Dreamland this week, Russell Targ, who earlier wrote about how he beat cancer with the help of a healer, shows just how easy it actually is to engage in remote viewing, how it is linked to spiritual life, and just why it is so important to our welfare and growth that we engage our own abilities in this area. Subscribers also get to learn about the marvelous new film "Touched," which tells the stories of some of the abductees that have been helped by Harvard psychiatrist John Mack.

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