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Charity isn't Always Good

We have too much corn, all of it subsidized by our tax dollars, which pay not only to grow it but to store it. This is why you're hearing so much about ethanol (which is made from corn) lately. The government is desperate to find a way to get rid of some of this, and one way it does this is by selling it at low prices it to poor countries, especially in Africa. But critics of this seemingly charitable act say that these imports actually lead to disease and even starvation.

In the August 17 issue of the Independent, Leonard Doyle writes that Care, one of the world's biggest charities, has decided not to continue to participate in shipping US corn to Africa. Doyle says that, "Care wants the US government to send money to buy food locally, rather than unwanted US produced food."

According to Doyle, Care says that the US "is causing rather than reducing hunger," because we insist that this corn must be sold, rather than distributed directly to starving people. According to the charity, this "undermines African farmers' ability to produce food, making the most vulnerable countries of the world even more dependent on aid to avert famine." In other words, they'll have to KEEP buying our excess corn from us! Is this REALLY charity? Doyle quotes Care spokeswoman Alina Labrada as saying, "I don't think that Americans who generously donate want people to go hungry at their expense."

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