News Stories

December 2012

Beware the FOODover

If you have get a hangover after New Year's Eve parties, it may not just be what you drank--it could be what those canapés you ate as well (and if you ate TOO MUCH, you need Anne Strieber's famous diet book!) Foods that give some people a headache...
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Alcohol Can Rewire Our Brains

Is it possible to rewire our brain? (NOTE: Subscribers can still listen to this show). Sometimes this may happen without our knowledge, such as when we drink too much.
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POP!

The force of a champagne cork can shatter glass--and it can also seriously injure your eye.

Warm bottles of champagne and improper cork-removal techniques cause serious, potentially blinding eye injuries each year. Champagne bottles contain pressure as high as 90 pounds per square inch--more than the pressure found inside a typical...
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Want to Live a Long Life? Have Kids!

Studies show that parents live much longer than people who do not have children--they even get fewer colds.

Using statistics, Danish researcher Esben Agerbo discovered that women without children experienced an annual rate of death four times greater than those...
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Changing the Speed of Time

We may not be able to manipulate the speed of light, but by tinkering with the neural connections that indicate its passage in our brains, we may be able to alter the speed of time--or at least with how fast the human brain PERCEIVES it to be. New research suggests timekeeping in the brain is decentralized, with different neural circuits having...
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Popular Furniture Brand Originally Built by Political Prisoners

When we're searching for simply-styled, low-cost furniture, fixtures and accessories, many of us head for Ikea. But there's something most of us don't know: This Swedish company originally used East German prisoners who were incarcerated for their political beliefs, to create these products.

In the November 16th edition of the...
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Why Our Brains May be Different

We share a majority of our genes and abilities with chimps, so what makes us different? (NOTE: Subscribers can still...
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Our DNA Doesn't Predict What Will Kill Us

If we could test every infant's DNA at birth, we could predict what future diseases they might have and guard against them early--right? Wrong!

In the April 3rd edition of the New York Times, Gina Kolata quotes researcher Bert Vogelstein as saying, "...
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Europeans Related to Native Americans--BEFORE They Came to North America

You may think you know who your ancestors were, but do you REALLY? Using genetic analyses, scientists have discovered that Northern European populations--including British, Scandinavians, French, and some Eastern Europeans--are descended from a mixture of two very different ancestral...
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Drinking Can SAVE Your Life

If you have a car accident and are taken to the hospital, you're less likely to die if you've been drinking (as long as you weren't drinking so much that it CAUSED the accident!) It turns out that injured patients are less likely to die in the hospital if they have alcohol in their blood, and the more alcohol, the more likely they were to survive...
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Habits: Good and Bad

Habits are behaviors that are so deeply wired into our brains that we perform them automatically. They can be both good and bad: A habit can allow you to follow the same route to work every day without thinking about it, freeing your brain to think about other things. But we can develop plenty of bad habits too.

A new study has found...
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Get High on Christmas Cookies!

On their INGREDIENTS, anyway. Common holiday baking ingredients, such as cinnamon, nutmeg and even marshmallows, can be used to produce a drug-like "high."

And toxicologist Christina Hantsch says that they can "...
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Men and Women Travel Differently

If you're flying during the holiday season, this is something you should know. And it doesn't just apply to tourists: As more women travel for business, these differences are being noticed by both airlines and hotels. While men still outnumber women frequent fliers, it's getting close to half and half.

Men complain that women pack...
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How to Get the Christmas Spirit

Having trouble getting into the spirit of Christmas? We have the solution for you: Whitley Strieber's wonderful little book...
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Rudolph's Nose Really IS Red

"Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" is one of those songs we hear piped into stores constantly during this season, and while we may get tired of it, we assume it's just a children's story. But it turns out there's some real science behind it.

When Dutch and...
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The Science of Gift Giving

When we buy someone a present, most of us try to get inside mind of the recipient, but thoughtful gifts--where you try to give someone what they want the most--are NOT the best bet. The giving of a thoughtful gift benefits the giver more than the person who receives it.

In the December 4th edition of the Wall Street Journal, Sumathi...
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What We Hate About Holiday Travel

The holidays are here, and many of us are traveling to see family and friends for Christmas. We've begun to dread those TSA lines that involve the scan and the pat down, being...
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How to Get the Christmas Spirit

Having trouble getting into the spirit of Christmas? We have the solution for you: Whitley Strieber's wonderful little book...
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What's Your Death Day

Since the end of the world didn't happen, we really don't know. (NOTE: Subscribers can still listen to this show).

We all know our birthday, but hospice doctors know something we don't:...
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When We Choose to Die

Most of us don't want to die today (and most of us won't have to), but a lot of us WOULD like to choose when and how we do it, when the time comes.
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Is This the End?

December 21st, 2012 is here--will we have a future? According to ancient Mayan prophecies (NOTE: Subscribers can still...
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The End of the World: Fire or Water?

How will the world end? It may not end today, but it WILL end someday. After Noah's ark finally reached land, God promised Noah that he would not flood the earth again, that it would be "the fire next time," and despite the rising ocean levels due to glacier melt, Whitley Strieber thinks this may be true. Read all about it in his...
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If the Driver Can't Think, Maybe his CAR Can

You can't yet buy a car that drives itself, but you'll soon be able to get one that lets you know whether or not you're a safe driver, by using biometric sensors to check on your...
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Being Bullied Changes Your Kid's Genes

Does this explain the kind of thing that went on at Columbine?

A recent study suggests that bullying by peers changes the structure surrounding a gene involved in regulating mood, making victims more vulnerable to mental health...
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Shyness Starts in the Brain (So Spray on Trust)

Shyness may be the result of deficits in two areas of the brain. A new study found that people who identify themselves as inhibited may have deficits in the amygdala and the hippocampus regions of the brain. The researchers drew this conclusion after they used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine shy adults with either an...
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How to Get the Christmas Spirit

Having trouble getting into the spirit of Christmas? We have the solution for you: Whitley Strieber's wonderful little book...
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Rudolph's Nose Really IS Red

"Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" is one of those songs we hear piped into stores constantly during this season, and while we may get tired of it, we assume it's just a children's story. But it turns out there's some real science behind it.

When Dutch and...
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DNA May Not Always Catch the Culprit

We're relying more and more on DNA evidence to catch rapists and murderers, but there's evidence that psychological bias plays a part in how this evidence is interpreted. Labs aren't always as objective as we'd like them to be.

Recently, we've seen cases where DNA evidence freed innocent people from prisons, but sometimes,...
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It's a Bigger World Than We Think

Biologists now think that that tiny creatures--from worms to insects--are much more important to the health of our planet than they seem to be. In fact, the fate of all life (including us!) may depend on them.

In the November 10th edition of the Observer, John Vidal quotes...
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How We Know Who's Testing Nukes

In the search for rogue nukes, researchers have discovered an unlikely tool: radio telescopes used by astronomers.

Working with astronomers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), researcher have analyzed historical data from the Very Large Array (VLA), a constellation of 27 radio telescopes near Socorro, New Mexico--and...
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