Beginning in 2011, eerie aerial sounds began to be heard worldwide. They consisted of roars, thuds, and a sound like a great trumpet echoing across the sky. As this became a well known popular phenomenon in 2012, a flood of hoax videos appeared on the internet, most of them using previously recorded sounds dubbed onto new video clips in order to give the impression that the phenomenon is more widespread even than it is. This is being done primarily with the trumpet-like sound, because it seems to fit the prophecy found in Corinthians 15: "In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed." It also coincides with millennial fever being stirred up by the arrival of the year 2012 and the predictions around the alleged end of the Mayan long-count calendar on December 21.

However, the fact remains that some of the recordings are authentic, and the question is what is causing these sounds. As some of them, in particular the roaring sounds, have been recorded when storm clouds were visible, it has been suggested that they might represent some sort of weather phenomenon. However, most of the recordings have been made when skies appeared to be clear, and there is no suggestion of wind even in those recorded against a cloudy background. A famous recording made in August 2011 in Kiev is authentic. It has been speculated by a Ukranian news station as possibly a resonance set up by construction in the area. You can watch this news story here.

They also compare the sound to that of the alien in the movie Cloverfield, and there has been speculation that the videos may be a viral marketing tool for an upcoming horror movie. However, the sound has been heard under multiple witness circumstances, so it is highly unlikely that it is viral marketing. In the case of this event during a baseball game, it was speculated that it could be wind blowing through the roof of the stadium, but there are no other reports of the sound being heard at Tropicana Field.

Many of the sounds, like the Kokomo Hum of the early 2000s, may eventually be explained in some way. The Kokomo Hum was explained by industrial activity, and this is also the probable explanation for the Windsor Hum.

Analysis of the new sounds reveal that their cycles vary with the location, from 11 to 21 seconds. The frequencies were uniformly low but also inconsistent. Taken together, these findings seem to rule out machines and to suggest a natural phenomenon. The difficulty with the ‘wind’ hypothesis is that there isn’t any sign of wind in any of the authentic videos. For example, this forestry crew in Alberta, Canada is hearing a very significant sound, but there is no sign of wind around them at all. Fast moving air does not generate sound in and of itself. It must be passing an obstruction of some kind to generate sound, and the trees in this video are clearly not in motion. In addition, this does not appear to be a wind noise. Its variability, however, does suggest a natural origin of some kind.

There have been some claims that the sounds are associated with UFO activity, but so far none of these have been verified, and the few videos connecting the two that have appeared so far are likely hoaxes. Should we authenticate such a video, we will report it on Unknowncountry at once.

There are a very large number of authentic recordings of the sounds from so many different locations, and the sounds are so unique, that it does not seem appropriate to dismiss them as known phenomena at this time. The authentic recordings of these sounds remain in the realm of the unknown.

(This story is illustrated with a recording from Manitoba.)

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