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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1348
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Saturday, April 27, 2013 - 9:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Anyone growing food at home? A few mater plants or more?

We start seeds indoors in February so plants have a good head start for plugging in the ground the first of April. Later up north. Well, usually we can plant the first of April but not this year or last. Winter lingered much longer than usual, this year longer than in my memory. Ground planting began this week, almost a month late due to the lingering cold weather. Planted all week, will be planting all next week too.

Gotta keep a sharp eye on the critters, bless their little raiding hearts. We don't mind sharing you understand, but last year due to the drought, they stopped sharing with us. In the past they took a little and that was fine, but last year they devastated the crops.

Milo the whistle pig ate the young squash plants and a bunch of others. The deer wiped out the okra
plantings and some other things. Ole bushy tail chowed down on the Roma & Cherry tomatoes. When the half acre of corn was about 6-10 inches tall, the crows pulled up the crop to eat the seeds at the bottom. Never had problems with crows before.

I replanted, put out rubber snakes. To no avail, they wiped out the second planting and the third in spite of a plastic owl. Planted a fourth time and put out an extensive system of doo-dads and finally got the crop. But when all was said and done we got the usual bumper crop with plenty to give away to friends, family, and food for the hungry program. It was just a lot more work.

Anywho, what are you growing this year? Anyone gardening for the first time or expanding the garden due to the economy or for off the grid reasons? Gonna can & freeze the garden booty for the winter? Favorite varieties? Critter problems?

Best Wishes from Mole Hollow Farm & Zoo
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bean
Senior Member
Username: tina

Post Number: 2395
Registered: 12-2001
Posted on Saturday, April 27, 2013 - 11:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

When I moved into my parents home to take care of my mom when she was dying,(last Aug. to Oct) all of the plants I had in pots died. So my thought this years was to start all over. Then my dad had a stroke, and the best time to plant was taken up in my time spent with him. So, all my thoughts to get stuff growing at a proper time kinda fell by the wayside. I did manage to get a tomato plant, some onions and basel in the ground, but nothing in pots. Here in metro Phoenix, I have found putting stuff in pots works better for me, as I can move them around to protect them from the intense sun...also, we have animals that seem to think that green stuff is for laying on and pulling out! I put the tomato and other stuff in the front. So far this most tiny little bit of food is doing well. It's supposed to get up to 99 today...probably more into the 100's....so I'm thinking I may not get much...started too late for here.. I know one tomato plant and some onions and basil is pathetic compared to your garden, but I still get such a good feeling from tending and watching them do their living...and appreciate their sharing!

I will most likely get some bells and hot peppers in pots despite the late start...they last for several growing seasons..I've had very good luck with those over the years....just have to baby them along thru the summer.

I checked out your Mole Hollow on line a while back. LOVELY and WONDERFUL! Alot of hard work sure pays off. I sure do respect your efforts, Cherokee.

bean
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kathy decker
Advanced Member
Username: fand

Post Number: 306
Registered: 3-2011
Posted on Saturday, April 27, 2013 - 12:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Every year we planted some sort of garden. One year we started an herb garden.

In 2010 we got together with the neighbors and started a community garden..pole beans, lettuces, cabbage, squash..yellow and zucchini..butternut too..tomatos, peppers, onions, Swiss chard, dill, cukes, a couple of raised beds for herbs and strawberries, some grapevines, blackberries.

It was strictly..work in the garden, hoe, pull weeds, whatever, and take what you need for tonight's dinner. The extra -and there was a lot -we gave to the elderly and shut ins. It was basically a three family endeavor ..Bill and I provided the experience and the plants, and the water from a few rain barrels. Wehad a compost pile, that was our fertilizer, and the town had a site where we got a truckload of mulch for free.

The garden was on a plot next to my house ..a lot of the houses in the neighborhood had been bought up by the state and torn down after the big flood of 2006..

Well, se had a great year but in the fall FEMA came in and shut us down..even though the town said it was ok to put a garden there, FEMA said the temporary structures..poles, plastic temporary fencing and raised boxes were against their rules for the use of the land.

If we wanted we could rent the land, but the next year a bigger flood came through and wiped us all out, and our little community was split up.

Here in our apartment, I grow herbs on my sunny windowsill, and dream of a home again someday where I can get down in the dirt.
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bean
Senior Member
Username: tina

Post Number: 2396
Registered: 12-2001
Posted on Saturday, April 27, 2013 - 4:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

...hummmmm..let me give fema a little lift..with my boots...
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blue
Senior Member
Username: jennyblue

Post Number: 1351
Registered: 3-2007
Posted on Sunday, April 28, 2013 - 7:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Each year I plan more and do less (go figure -- or not ;). i progress more on the infrastructure and less on the planting/harvesting. i got my fingers crossed for this summer, and -- assuming i dont fall outta this world entirely -- i am asking God for a blessing. But with all the turmoil of our lives -- I feel any gardening goes a long way. Some science came out recently about something in the soil contributing to human well being. Did I read that here? I am trying to find it again.

Thanks for the great post cherokee -- enjoyable reading. I share w/the animals, too -- and had a similar experience. Stuff they never used to eat before is being eaten. I hope your garden grows fantastic!

I plan to contribute more as the warm weather and longer days progress. Right now I am anxiously awaiting my perennial herbs (chives, thyme, sage (and omg! -- maybe the rosemary survived!) to begin growing again so I can add them to my cooking. I use them almost daily once they get going. I wish I could get it together to grow them inside year long. They dont survive the low humidity and lesser light of my unmodified winter house.

Good luck everyone! I hope we have a happy and productive summer :-)
We are the ones we've been waiting for.
Hopi Elders 2001.

to be a rock and still to roll . . .
change we can believe in is here -- The Ed Show
Love is the Way ~ Jesus of Nazareth
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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1351
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Monday, April 29, 2013 - 7:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Bean- Good for you! Almost anything can be grown in pots. Our deck has a lot of stuff, including a cherry tomato plant just for snacking.

Best Wishes from Mole Hollow
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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1353
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Tuesday, April 30, 2013 - 11:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Kathy- If your backyard, balcony, or patio has sunlight, you might consider using the Square Foot Gardening Method,(by Mel Bartholemew). You can grow an unbelievable amount of food in very little space. 80% less space, 80% less water, 80% less work. And the plants grow more lush. Tomatos, cucumbers, etc seven feet tall.

Boxes sectioned off into individual square feet, one plant per foot, some things 2, 4, or even 16 per square foot. The growing medium is never walked on so it stays fluffy. The rare weed pulls out easily roots and all.

Boxes can be whatever size you prefer. 4'x4', 4'x8', 10' or 12'. If you garden organically you will spend no money on fertilizer or plant food.

We have no shortage of land but use the square foot method because of all the advantages- more food, less work. Some people who live in apartments have a box on their balcony or patio.

Best Wishes from Mole Hollow
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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1354
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Tuesday, April 30, 2013 - 11:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Blue- Thank you. Herb gardens are great. The Barn Goddess established an extensive herb garden near the back door so she can take what she needs when cooking. She has heirloom garlic passed down from her great grandmother. Be careful growing oregeno. The stuff will take over the world!

Best Wishes from Mole Hollow
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blue
Senior Member
Username: jennyblue

Post Number: 1353
Registered: 3-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 30, 2013 - 8:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

oregano -- indeed! its already done that in my yard! all over the place -- came w/the house ;) i want to make essential oils eventually (altho I will probably lose my house before that ever happens). I bet I could harvest enough oregano each season to keep me supplied in the kitchen for several years! Burdock root and garlic as well :-)

I hope to grow spinach, peas, tomatoes, squash, sunflowers, strawberries, basil . . . and
We are the ones we've been waiting for.
Hopi Elders 2001.

to be a rock and still to roll . . .
change we can believe in is here -- The Ed Show
Love is the Way ~ Jesus of Nazareth
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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1358
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Thursday, May 02, 2013 - 6:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Blue- A couple years ago I planted hundreds of sunflowers. A really big plot. They got to about one foot tall and in a single night the deer ated every one of them. Turns out deer have a soft spot for sunflowers.

Best Wishes from Mole Hollow
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Sharon2
Senior Member
Username: sharon2468

Post Number: 4837
Registered: 8-2004
Posted on Thursday, May 02, 2013 - 6:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Cherokee, I've been using the square foot gardening method since I read Mel Bartholemew's book several years ago. I wouldn't have believed the yield unless I did it myself.

I put plants of every kind in a tiny area and they all grew and produced!
Amazing!
Our life is determined by the choices we make!
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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1359
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Thursday, May 02, 2013 - 8:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Sharon, It's amazing ain't it? If people were aware of how little work and space and how bountiful the harvests they would switch fer sure.

In his latest book he uses lattice strips to divide the foots instead of string. We prefer the string as they don't get in the way and last for many years. The back side of our boxes has a 7 ft tall rack for climbers like tomatoes, cukes, etc. Heck they'd grow to 15 ft, maybe 20 but we'd need a ladder to harvest. As it is they keep growing past 7 ft then bend over so we cut off the top, otherwise the main stem will break under the weight.

There is no soil in the boxes, just fluffy organic material and the only food we have to add is a little stuff from our compost pile. Free is cheap.

This year I'm adding a 4'x12' box for strawberries.

This morning we saw Milo the whistle pig sitting on his hind legs staring at one of the boxes. His chubby little self better keep his cotton pickin' paws off!

Best Wishes from Mole Hollow
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kathy decker
Advanced Member
Username: fand

Post Number: 310
Registered: 3-2011
Posted on Thursday, May 02, 2013 - 1:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Wow, that sounds great! I will have to get that book. We are looking for a house this year, so I will probably just stick to a few pots and window boxes this summer, but I love the idea of raised beds..and high yields. I love canning and drying fruits and herbs ..patience ...in good time...
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Sharon2
Senior Member
Username: sharon2468

Post Number: 4838
Registered: 8-2004
Posted on Thursday, May 02, 2013 - 9:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Kathy, my neighbor has a 4'x4' raised bed and plants over 12 tomato plants inside and marigolds around the edges. She has tomatoes coming out of the woodwork... literally!

Cherokee, what is your "fluffy organic material"?
Our life is determined by the choices we make!
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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1364
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Friday, May 03, 2013 - 10:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

The growing medium is pretty much what Mel lists in his book. Peat, compost, and some vermiculite. Over the years we just keep adding compost as plant food.
(An alternative is to fill the boxes with potting soil which is similar.)

The fluffy stuff makes for unhindered root growth which results in great plant growth. It only has to be six inches deep except for root plants like carrots, thus the front one foot deep row in our boxes is 12 inches deep.

We interplant with marigolds too along with nasturtiums as they are a natural insect repellant. Plus nasturtiums are edible and make a pretty addition to salads. There are other edible flowers too.

Kathy, if you decide to put in some boxes- Box kits are available but expensive. You can easily build your own. For example a 4ft x 8ft box needs only:

1 2"x 6" x 8' pressure treated lumber cut in half.

2 2"x 6" x 8'

Rust proof screws 3" & 1 1/4"

Stand on edge and screw together with 3" screws.

Measure and mark tops of boards every 12" on all 4 sides. Put shorter screws into marks. Tie construction string to screws to create a square foot grid across the box.

All that and more is in his book.

You will find that once your boxes are in place that most of the work will be harvesting all that bounty.

Best Wishes from Mole Hollow
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kathy decker
Advanced Member
Username: fand

Post Number: 311
Registered: 3-2011
Posted on Friday, May 03, 2013 - 4:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

We built boxes for our community garden so we can do that..thanks Cherokee.
Can't do much in our back yard...just mow it because the landlord is out of town but won't allow plantings.
Just bought a nice rosemary at price chopper..put it on our little back porch.
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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1369
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Saturday, May 04, 2013 - 11:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

The ground is still not warm enough to plant corn & okra. I read that this is the second longest winter on record and might turn out to be the longest.

I guess I shouldn't complain, we'll still end up with a longer growing season than folks up north.

Best Wishes from Mole Hollow
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Jimmy
Senior Member
Username: chippyo

Post Number: 1743
Registered: 8-2002
Posted on Friday, May 10, 2013 - 8:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

plants in this weekend..
"Don't take life to seriously;no one gets out alive."

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Jimmy
Senior Member
Username: chippyo

Post Number: 1744
Registered: 8-2002
Posted on Friday, May 10, 2013 - 8:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

best girl & cherry :30 maters
10 sweet basils
5 eggplants
mess of banana, serano & tabsco peppers
bell peppers.
"Don't take life to seriously;no one gets out alive."

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bean
Senior Member
Username: tina

Post Number: 2405
Registered: 12-2001
Posted on Friday, May 10, 2013 - 10:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

I'm gunna plant this weekend too.

Is that tomatoes I see on my plant??? Yes! amazing, since the main body of the plant was broken by wind a while back...lost all my buds. Hope they can get big and red before the heat really hits..

Cherokee...I've really tried to like okra....the flavor is just fine...the goo ???? puts me off.

I'm planning on peppers...a variety...maybe some flowers too...for color in my yard. I hope I get to all the stuff I want to get to this weekend....Seems like I run out of hours...?
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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1381
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Saturday, May 11, 2013 - 10:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Bean- I don't like the goo either. Slimy.

Cut into chunks, batter dipped and deep fried. No slime, crispy crunchy delicious.

All summer & fall Sundays are spent freezing & canning. Among that stuff, the Barn Goddess deep fries okra, vacuum seals it, and freezes it. Then over the winter we open a package and heat it in the toaster oven. Comes out just as crunchy as if it were hot out of the deep fryer.

We grow a variety of peppers. From jalapenos I make Poppers, vacuum seal & freeze them. Open a pack and warm in toaster oven.

Speaking of deep fried, ever hear of Scotch Eggs? Not I, until I stumbled on the recipe last week. I fixed some up and we found them to be most excellent. I've never been a fan of hard boiled eggs but I liked these.

Basically ya hard boil eggs, encase them in a layer of breakfast sausage, coat with flour, coat with egg, then coat with Ritz cracker crumbs. Deep fry til golden, then bake in oven. Slice in half lengthwise. Taste as good as they look. Google for recipe.

Best Wishes from Mole Hollow
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Sharon2
Senior Member
Username: sharon2468

Post Number: 4853
Registered: 8-2004
Posted on Saturday, May 11, 2013 - 10:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

I'm going to try sweet potatoes for the first time. I have no idea if they will grow but I love to experiment.

Also happened to see Stevia plants and got one. I looked it up online and you can eat the leaves. They are incredibly sweet right off the plant!
Found some strawberry plants with pink blossoms! Had to get those too.
Our life is determined by the choices we make!
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blue
Senior Member
Username: jennyblue

Post Number: 1355
Registered: 3-2007
Posted on Sunday, May 12, 2013 - 6:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

incredible burst of growth this last week. I thought the oregano had choked out the thyme but I was wrong! Yay! and, it was a good excuse to get a few more plants :-) Rosemary didnt make it (boo-hoo). I think it makes the winter but after the snow melts it dies in the early spring. Sage has leaves ... Chives are over a foot high . . . cldnt even find them two weeks ago. winter savory is producing again as well.

And the pruning has paid off on the lilac bush. Finally -- some lilacs that aren't 8 feet high :-)

ps. i am about to enter the ranks of the retired/semi-retired. My mom is in rehab and slipping away more each time she spends a lot of time away from people she is familiar with. I am hoping to get her home with me soon. (Prayers are appreciated.) I feel like the fool about to walk over the cliff. Thank God for the calming effect of the earth/celebration of life just outside my door ... the smell of fresh herbs in my soup and on my eggs and meat . . .

oh and fresh strawberries for a reasonable price . . . someday I hope from in the garden (there's a blossom but chances are the critters will get the strawberries before I will . . .)

This summer i hope to learn about the square foot gardening cherokee and Sharon have talked about.

The Stevia plant leaves are really, really, really sweet! Had one once but didnt do much with it other than taste the leaves.

(Message edited by jennyblue on May 12, 2013)
We are the ones we've been waiting for.
Hopi Elders 2001.

to be a rock and still to roll . . .
change we can believe in is here -- The Ed Show
Love is the Way ~ Jesus of Nazareth
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Sharon2
Senior Member
Username: sharon2468

Post Number: 4855
Registered: 8-2004
Posted on Monday, May 13, 2013 - 6:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Blue, I hope you can get your mom settled in with you. It will still be hard, though.

I tried putting pieces of Stevia leaves in my oatmeal but it didn't sweeten it at all. I will have to play around with it. I haven't tried it in cold drinks yet. But eating it right off the plant is fun. How do they get a white powder from a green plant anyway? I've been using the Stevia powder for quite some time, now. Thought it would fun to grow my own.

I had to bring the sweet potato slips inside because the cold nights made them wilt. They perked up in my kitchen so will wait until I can plant them outside.

Chives are so hardy! You can't kill them. I keep mine in a pot. If you plant them in the ground, they spread.
Our life is determined by the choices we make!
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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1384
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Monday, May 13, 2013 - 8:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

The Barn Goddess gave some oregano to some friends of ours. They asked about care & feeding. she said, "Throw it on the ground and stomp on it, it'll do just fine."

May 1st is usually when it's warm enough to go swimming. It's in the 30's. This ain't May it's February.

Best Wishes from Mole Hollow
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kathy decker
Advanced Member
Username: fand

Post Number: 317
Registered: 3-2011
Posted on Monday, May 13, 2013 - 11:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

The stevia powder you buy in stores is processed and bleached.
I grew it a few years ago...mostly just for nibbles and in fruit salads..my friend chopped up the leaves and put them in her coffee filter with the ground coffee and brewed them together for sweetened coffee.

Cold snap here in the north..28 degrees forecast for tonight..have to bring in my flowers and herbs..brrr
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Buddie
Senior Member
Username: buddie

Post Number: 6120
Registered: 3-2008
Posted on Friday, July 05, 2013 - 5:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

My Japaneezz Maple is dying..
we have sooo many tiny spiders
I think they liked my sapling :-(
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Sharon2
Senior Member
Username: sharon2468

Post Number: 4943
Registered: 8-2004
Posted on Saturday, July 06, 2013 - 9:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

I hope not, Buddie.

Does this help?

http://japanesemaplelovers.com/is-my-japanese-maple-dying/
Our life is determined by the choices we make!
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Buddie
Senior Member
Username: buddie

Post Number: 6187
Registered: 3-2008
Posted on Friday, August 09, 2013 - 10:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

It does I overwatered OMG

'He' is now sprouting new
leaves and buds..I put 'him'
in a new sun direction..
'he' loves me :-)
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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1456
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Saturday, August 10, 2013 - 9:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Buddy I sympathize. Our crops are suffering from over watering- by all this rain. Rain, rain, and more rain. There's an old adage, "Every drought ends with a flood." Certainly seems to be true.

Best Wishes from Mole Hollow
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lassensage
Advanced Member
Username: lassensage

Post Number: 278
Registered: 8-2011
Posted on Wednesday, August 14, 2013 - 1:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Our tomato plants are huge this yr.Getting a handful of cherry tomatoes every other day.

Having some 40F nights this summer, already feels like fall around here.

Very happy to have rain and not dry lightning from the many Thunder storms we have had this summer.
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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1464
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Wednesday, August 14, 2013 - 10:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Good for you!

We plant eight cherry tomato plants but due to all the rain, when they're almost ripe most of them split open.

Time to plant the fall crops.

Best Wishes from Rainy Hollow
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Sharon2
Senior Member
Username: sharon2468

Post Number: 5030
Registered: 8-2004
Posted on Sunday, August 18, 2013 - 10:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Well, so far the deer have eaten the apples on my apple tree. Something has eaten my tomatoes (plants and all), my sweet potato vines, my corn, my day lilies, my strawberries. I have potted cucumbers on the porch and they are doing great!

Next year, we're putting a fence around a designated garden area. Do those fake snakes and owls really keep critters away?
Our life is determined by the choices we make!
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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1470
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Monday, August 19, 2013 - 9:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Sharon- Are Snakes & Owls & fences effective? It depends.

Snakes & owls yes. But only if they are moved to another location in the garden daily. Twice a day even better. Otherwise the critters figure it out real quick and then ignore them.

Fences. Deer can leap a six foot fence from a standing still position. We've watched them do it.
Driving by our neighbors we have seen deer inside fenced gardens gobbling up their crops. Also during drought or other hard times when deer become desperate nothing will stop them.

Not hopeless, just a constant struggle. From crows to deer, critters don't like things that move. It spooks them. And there are things you can spray on your crops they don't like. I have found the following to be effective:

Plastic snakes and owls: Move daily.

We had a problem of deer wiping out our okra patch of 60 plants. I put a steel fence post at the four corners and ran bright yellow construction string around it bottom, middle, & top. Then hung those white plastic bags that stores give you for purchases all along the string. They move in the slightest breeze. It worked.

When our corn grew to 6 inches the crows pulled them all up, hundreds, to eat the seed at the bottom. I ran string directly over each row and hung plastic bags along it. Once the corn plants were about 1 1/2 foot tall I took them down.

There are robot like thingies you can put in your garden that have motion detectors. When activated a whirey-gig type thing spins and it emits an alarm.

Hair. You can get bags of hair from hairdressers. Just ask. Spread big clumps of it among or around your goodies. I've never used this method but hear it is quite effective if renewed on a regular basis. The ladies where I get my hair cut say they are frequently asked for the stuff.

The string and bag thing is very popular in these parts and can be seen in almost all the gardens around here. String is cheap and bags are free.

Hope this helps.

Best Wishes from Mole Hollow
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Sharon2
Senior Member
Username: sharon2468

Post Number: 5033
Registered: 8-2004
Posted on Monday, August 19, 2013 - 5:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Years ago we had an 'outdoor' dog and never had any problems with our garden.

I will try all of your suggestions. Thank you.

I tried hanging bars of soap in my apple tree but I think they must have liked the soap because my apples still disappeared.

The weird thing is that this summer, everything was abundant but they still preferred my garden.
Our life is determined by the choices we make!
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cherokee
Senior Member
Username: cherokee

Post Number: 1473
Registered: 2-2001
Posted on Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 8:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Same here, abundant rain this year but the critters are running amuck. A doggie of course is the bestest solution. String- Construction string sold at hardware and home improvement stores. That stuff will last forever outside and you can roll it up and use it elsewhere if need be. Use plenty of bags- no more than three feet apart.

The soap thing didn't work well for us either.

If you have a garden tank sprayer see the egg thingy in this article:

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/natres/06520.html

Good luck.

Best Wishes from Mole Hollow
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Sharon2
Senior Member
Username: sharon2468

Post Number: 5036
Registered: 8-2004
Posted on Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 10:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

I've never heard of the egg solution before. Anxious to try it. Easy enough to do.

Thanks again!
Our life is determined by the choices we make!
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Harper
New member
Username: harper

Post Number: 8
Registered: 3-2014
Posted on Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 11:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

I'm starting to get my garden supplies . We have so much snow this year makes you when it 'll all melt.
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Sharon2
Senior Member
Username: sharon2468

Post Number: 5451
Registered: 8-2004
Posted on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 6:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post

Harper, what zone are you in. Your profile doesn't say.

My zone has changed over time. We used to be in zone 5 but I think we are warmer now.
Our life is determined by the choices we make!

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